1. Artificial Intelligence: Here are the different avatars of AI at the centre of innovation

Artificial Intelligence: Here are the different avatars of AI at the centre of innovation

At the annual fujitsu Forum, held in Tokyo recently, technology—largely artificial intelligence (AI) including machine learning—was at the centre of all innovation, with the aim of helping solve everyday problems.

By: | Updated: July 4, 2017 6:08 PM
Artificial Intelligence, AI , Tokyo, Instruments and Electronics, china, POS, INESA Future store is one such example of how with AI, running a retail store is child’s play.

At the annual fujitsu  Forum, held in Tokyo recently, technology—largely artificial intelligence (AI) including machine learning—was at the centre of all innovation, with the aim of helping solve everyday problems. Future store is one such example of how with AI, running a retail store is child’s play. In a future store, a robot roams inside a shop. Through the use of AI, it collects a combination of various types of data for analysis, including product shelf video data, point-of-sale (POS), and shelf arrangement data. Based on the collected data, the robot suggests which products are to be displayed on shelves and at what time.

This is enabled by sending real-time product shelf condition data to the shop staff and therefore, improving operational efficiency in the store. Another example is its work for the Instruments and Electronics (Shanghai) Associates Group (INESA), a state-owned firm in China that provides smart city solutions.

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Fujitsu created a smart factory for its subsidiary INESA Display Materials. It built an intelligent system to handle data collection on production, quality, efficiency, cost control and reduction in energy consumption, besides storage, processing and visualisation to enable fast access and analysis of information in mass production operations as well as energy monitoring. “In our production environment, there are numerous data sources that provide information on processes, equipment and environmental factors, which can directly affect the quality of our product,” said Wei Fengrong, director, information, INESA Display Materials Co.

Another technology which has started making waves is an interface device called Ontenna. The device, worn atop the user’s hair, helps deaf people to perceive rhythms, patterns, and volumes of sounds through their hair as it conveys the characteristics of sounds using vibration and light.

The reporter was in Japan at the invitation of Fujitsu.

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