1. 62% Democrats, independents don’t want Hillary Clinton to run again

62% Democrats, independents don’t want Hillary Clinton to run again

A majority of Democratic and independent voters made clear that they do not foresee Hillary Clinton in their 2020 vision of the presidential election, according to a USA Today/Suffolk University poll.

By: | Washington | Published: December 22, 2016 10:45 AM
According to the poll released on Wednesday, 62 per cent of Democrats and independents surveyed said the twice-failed presidential candidate should not mount another campaign in 2020. (Reuters) According to the poll released on Wednesday, 62 per cent of Democrats and independents surveyed said the twice-failed presidential candidate should not mount another campaign in 2020. (Reuters)

A majority of Democratic and independent voters made clear that they do not foresee Hillary Clinton in their 2020 vision of the presidential election, according to a USA Today/Suffolk University poll.

According to the poll released on Wednesday, 62 per cent of Democrats and independents surveyed said the twice-failed presidential candidate should not mount another campaign in 2020, and only 23 per cent would be excited by her campaign if she did, Politico reported.

The two people they would most like to see are two of the most prominent Democratic-aligned politicians unlikely to seek the White House in 2020: Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and Vice President Joe Biden.

You may also like to watch this:

Forty-four per cent and 43 per cent of those voters, respectively, said they would be excited to see Sanders and Biden run, the poll showed.

A majority of Democrats and independents would like to see a new name, though.

While 35 per cent would be excited about a Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren run and 10 percent for former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, 66 per cent would like to see “someone entirely new” become the Democratic Party’s standard-bearer as it looks to rebound from a surprising Election Day loss that saw US President-elect Donald Trump prevail over Clinton and Republicans maintain control over the House and Senate.

The national survey of 1,000 likely voters was conducted December 14-18 via land-lines and cellphones.

It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

  1. No Comments.

Go to Top