1. Aadhaar Mobile link: Are you getting alerts about this? Find out what you must do

Aadhaar Mobile link: Are you getting alerts about this? Find out what you must do

Aadhaar Mobile link: Are you receiving messages from your telecom operators threatening to disconnect cellphone connections if you fail to link your Aadhaar card number to it?

By: | New Delhi | Updated: September 25, 2017 12:33 PM
aadhaar mobile link, aadhaar card sc order, supreme court, mobile number link aadhaar, adhaar card, uidai Aadhaar Mobile link: Are you receiving messages from your telecom operators threatening to disconnect cellphone connections if you fail to link your Aadhaar card number to it? (IE image)

Aadhaar Mobile link: Are you receiving messages from your telecom operators threatening to disconnect cellphone connections if you fail to link your Aadhaar card number to it? If you are then don’t worry, the circular released by Department of Telecommunications (DOT) seeking Aadhaar mobile linking has no legal force, according to Indian Express report. This re-verification requires a user to visit a telecom service centre, undergo biometric authentication by putting their fingerprints on an authentication device. After doing this, one should hope that the details in the Aadhaar database must match with their cellular connection.

The circulars cited stray sentences from a dismissal order in February of a public interest petition in the Supreme Court titled as Lokniti Foundation v. the Union of India.

For a variety of reasons, this does not amount to a “direction” to the government as claimed in the DOT circular. First, the basis of the order and the references to Aadhaar emerges from a counter-affidavit filed by the government in the Lokniti case. Rather than volunteering information on the pre-existing court orders that limit the Aadhaar programme to a voluntary service restricted to specific services, the government instead advocates its use for re-verification. Second, the SC nowhere uses the phrase, “direction” which is a term of art contained in court orders to impart a binding force.

On August 24, in a landmark decision that will affect the lives of all Indians, the Supreme Court had unanimously declared that right to privacy was a Fundamental right under the Constitution. A nine-judge Constitution bench headed by Chief Justice J S Khehar ruled that “right to privacy is an intrinsic part of Right to Life and Personal Liberty under Article 21 and entire Part III of the Constitution”, according to PTI report.

The ruling on the highly contentious issue was to deal with a batch of petitions challenging the Centre’s move to make Aadhaar mandatory for availing the benefits of various social welfare schemes. Others members of the bench comprising Justices J Chelameswar, S A Bobde, R K Agrawal, R F Nariman, A M Sapre, D Y Chandrachud, S K Kaul and S Abdul Nazeer also shared the same view.The nine judges unanimously overruled the two earlier judgements of the apex court that right to privacy is not protected under the Constitution. The bench overruled the M P Sharma verdict of 1950 and that of Kharak Singh of 1960. The judgement in the Kharak Singh case was pronounced by eight judges and in M P Sharma it was delivered by six judges. Justice Khehar, who read the operative portion of the judgement, said the subsequent verdicts pronounced after M P Sharma and Kharak Singh have laid down the correct position of the law.

  1. R
    Reader
    Sep 25, 2017 at 2:44 pm
    The Supreme Court is yet to take a decision on the validity of Aadhaar and whether the State can compulsorily link Aadhaar to various programs and all financial transactions. On 24 August 2017, a nine-judge Consti-tution Bench of the Supreme Court ruled against the Central Government to declare that privacy is a fundamental right under the Consti-tution of India. The Supreme Court is set to hear peti-tions challenging the validity and other aspects of Aadhaar in the first week of November this year. So just wait for the verdict.
    Reply
    1. R
      Reader
      Sep 25, 2017 at 2:43 pm
      A centralized and inter-linked biometric database like Aadhaar will lead to profiling and self-censorship, endangering freedom. Personal data gathered under the Aadhaar program is prone to misuse and surveillance. A centralized and interlinked database can lead to commercial abuse. Aadhaar project has created a vulnerability to identi-ty fraud, even identi-ty theft. Easy harvesting of biometrics traits and publicly-available Aadhaar numbers increase the risk of impersonation, especially online and banking fraud. Centralized databases can be hacked. Biometrics can be cloned, copied and reused.
      Reply
      1. R
        Reader
        Oct 7, 2017 at 5:02 am
        Biometrics can be cloned, copied and reused. Thus, BIOMETRICS CAN BE FAKED. High-resolution cameras can capture your fingerprints and iris information from a distance. Every eye hospital will have iris images of its patients. So another person can clone your fingerprints and iris images without your knowledge, and the same can be used for authentication. If the Aadhaar scheme is NOT STOPPED by the Supreme Court, the biometric details of Indians will soon be available for s-ale.
        Reply
      2. R
        Reader
        Sep 25, 2017 at 2:43 pm
        UK’s Biometric ID Database was dismantled. Why the United Kingdom's biometrics-linked National Identi-ty Card project to create a centralized register of sensitive information about residents similar to Aadhaar was scrapped in 2010?? The reasons were the massive threat posed to the privacy of people, the possibility of a surveillance state, the dangers of maintaining such a huge centralized repository of personal information, and the purposes it could be used for, and the dangers of such a centralized database being hacked. The other reasons were the unreliability of such a large-scale biometric verification processes, and the ethics of using biometric identification
        Reply
        1. R
          Reader
          Sep 25, 2017 at 2:42 pm
          The US Social Security Number (SSN) card has no biometric details, no photograph, no physical description and no birth date. All it does is confirm that a particular number has been issued to a particular name. Instead, a driving license or state ID card is used as an identification for adults. The US government does not collect the biometric details of its own citizens for issuing Social Security Number.
          Reply
          1. R
            Reader
            Oct 7, 2017 at 5:05 am
            The US government DOES NOT collect the biometric details of its own citizens for the purpose of issuing Social Security Number. The US collects the fingerprints of only those citizens who are involved in any criminal activity (it has nothing to do with SSN), and the citizens of other countries who come to the US.
            Reply

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