1. AIG stripped of too big to fail label by US regulators

AIG stripped of too big to fail label by US regulators

Insurer AIG will no longer face the stricter federal oversight of a "too big to fail" institution following a vote by a panel of top US financial regulators.

By: | Washington | Published: September 30, 2017 6:16 AM
US financial regulators, US financial stability, too big to fail, AIG, Insurer AIG, threat to financial stability, risk to financial stability Insurer AIG will no longer face the stricter federal oversight of a “too big to fail” institution following a vote by a panel of top US financial regulators. (Image: Reuters)

Insurer AIG will no longer face the stricter federal oversight of a “too big to fail” institution following a vote by a panel of top US financial regulators. The Financial Stability Oversight Council voted 6-3 to strip AIG of the designation that its failure could “pose a threat to US financial stability,” according to a press release issued yesterday evening by the US Department of Treasury. The move greatly eases the regulatory oversight of AIG, which was saved through a government bailout at the height of the 2008 financial crisis because of its close links with other key financial institutions. Since that time, AIG has shrunk after selling off numerous divisions. “The Council has worked diligently to thoroughly reevaluate whether AIG poses a risk to financial stability,” said Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who supported the move. “This action demonstrates our commitment to act decisively to remove any designation if a company does not pose a threat to financial stability.”

Mnuchin was joined in the majority by other regulators including Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, acting comptroller of the currency Keith Noreika and J. Christopher Giancarlo, chair of the Commodities Futures Trading Commission. Those voting against were Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; Martin Gruenberg, chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; and Melvin Watt, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency.

AIG applauded the vote. “The Council’s decision reflects the substantial and successful de-risking that AIG’s employees have achieved since 2008,” said chief executive Brian Duperreault. “The company is committed to continued vigilant risk management and to working closely with our numerous regulators to enable a strong AIG to continue to serve our clients.” Shares in AIG rose 1.0 per cent in afterhours trade to $62.

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