1. Ramesh seeks early hearing on Aadhaar Bill

Ramesh seeks early hearing on Aadhaar Bill

Congress leader Jairam Ramesh on Tuesday sought early hearing on his 2016 petition challenging the introduction of the Aadhaar Bill as a money Bill in Parliament.

By: | Published: August 30, 2017 2:21 AM
Jairam Ramesh, 2016 petition, Aadhaar bill, money bill, parliament, congress leader Congress leader Jairam Ramesh on Tuesday sought early hearing on his 2016 petition challenging the introduction of the Aadhaar Bill as a money Bill in Parliament. (Image: IE)

Congress leader Jairam Ramesh on Tuesday sought early hearing on his 2016 petition challenging the introduction of the Aadhaar Bill as a money Bill in Parliament. A bench headed by Chief Justice Dipak Misra posted the matter for hearing on Friday after senior counsel and Congress leader P Chidambaram, appearing for Ramesh, sought early hearing on the petition. However, the Bench said that it had not yet read the privacy judgement, so the petitioner needs to mention the matter again  on Friday. The Aadhaar scheme has assumed importance since the SC, last week, deemed privacy as a fundamental right under the Constitution. Ramesh had challenged Aadhaar (Targeted Delivery of Financial and Other Subsidies, Benefits and Services) Bill 2016, claiming it to be ‘unconstitutional’ as it was incorrectly introduced as a money Bill. He claimed that the Bill was certified as a money Bill to avoid its scrutiny by the Rajya Sabha which does not have any say on such legislations. The Bill was discussed and passed by the Lok Sabha on March 11 last year. It was taken up in Rajya Sabha on March 16, where several amendments were made to it.

Ramesh had challenged Aadhaar (Targeted Delivery of Financial and Other Subsidies, Benefits and Services) Bill 2016, claiming it to be ‘unconstitutional’ as it was incorrectly introduced as a money Bill. He claimed that the Bill was certified as a money Bill to avoid its scrutiny by the Rajya Sabha which does not have any say on such legislations. The Bill was discussed and passed by the Lok Sabha on March 11 last year. It was taken up in Rajya Sabha on March 16, where several amendments were made to it. The Bill was returned same evening to the Lok Sabha, which rejected all the amendments adopted by the Upper House and passed it without any of these changes. The Bill is aimed at giving statutory backing for transferring government subsidies and other benefits and ensuring that these reached the intended beneficiaries. It also lays down a regulatory framework to protect core biometric information of Aadhaar cardholders from any unauthorised disclosure or sharing.

The Bill is aimed at giving statutory backing for transferring government subsidies and other benefits and ensuring that these reached the intended beneficiaries. It also lays down a regulatory framework to protect core biometric information of Aadhaar cardholders from any unauthorised disclosure or sharing.The Centre had opposed the plea saying that it fulfilled the criteria as the expenditure for the welfare schemes has to be drawn from the Consolidated Fund of India. It further said that it covered all constitutional provisions to bring it under the ambit of a money Bill.

  1. R
    Reader
    Aug 30, 2017 at 7:52 am
    Why the United Kingdom's biometrics-linked National Ident-ity Card project to create a centralized register of sensitive information about residents similar to Aadhaar was scrapped in 2010?? The reasons were the massive threat posed to the privacy of people, the possibility of a surveillance state, the dangers of maintaining such a huge centralized repository of sensitive information, and the purposes it could be used for, and the dangers of such a centralized database being hacked. The other reasons were the unreliability of such a large-scale biometric verification processes, and the ethics of using biometric identification.
    Reply
    1. R
      Reader
      Aug 30, 2017 at 7:51 am
      The US Social Security Number (SSN) has no biometric details, no photograph, no physical description and no birth date. All it does is confirm that a particular number has been issued to a particular name. Instead, a driver's license or state ID card is used as an identification for adults. The US government does not collect the biometric details of its own citizens.
      Reply
      1. R
        Reader
        Aug 30, 2017 at 7:51 am
        The privacy laws of the United States deal with several different legal concepts. One is the invasion of privacy, a tort based in common law allowing an aggrieved party to bring a lawsuit against an individual who unlawfully intrudes into his or her private affairs, discloses his or her private information, publicizes him or her in a false light, or appropriates his or her name for personal gain. The essence of the law derives from a right to privacy, defined broadly as "the right to be let alone."
        Reply

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