1. China space station Tiangong-1 in freefall, heading towards earth, astronomers say

China space station Tiangong-1 in freefall, heading towards earth, astronomers say

China's first space station , The Tiangong-1 satellite was launched in 2011, and was supposed to come back to Earth in a controlled crash. But now astronomers are wary that the sattelite now appears to have gone into freewill.

By: | Published: July 14, 2016 6:44 PM
The rocket loaded with China's unmanned space module Tiangong-1 lifts off from the launch pad in the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, Gansu province September 29, 2011 (Pic: Reuters) The rocket loaded with China’s unmanned space module Tiangong-1 lifts off from the launch pad in the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center, Gansu province September 29, 2011 (Pic: Reuters)

China’s first space station , The Tiangong-1 satellite was launched in 2011, and was supposed to come back to Earth in a controlled crash. But now astronomers are wary that the sattelite now appears to have gone into freewill.

The Independent reported that like other lost satellites, it’s likely that the freefalling station would burn up on its way back into Earth and come back down as molten metal rather than with a big crash. “But people have warned that it could still be a ‘real bad day’ if the rocket fell back down to Earth, “but odds are it will land in the ocean or in an unpopulated area,” it said.

But since the size of the satellite is huge it is possible that there will be parts of it that might survive till its entry into our atmosphere.

The satellite with an aim to challenge the International Space Station, was used for two years as docking exercise to build other stations, after it finished its work in 2013.

But it still does a few investigative and scientific work, according to a statement from Chinese officials.

Thomas Dorman, an amateur astronomer, has been watching the movement of the satellite and believes that China has lost control of it. The fact that China has given no public statement on its safety could mean that it is lost, he told Space.com.

“If I am right, China will wait until the last minute to let the world know it has a problem with their space station,” Mr Dorman said.

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