1. Canada rolls out ‘glow in the dark’ coin

Canada rolls out ‘glow in the dark’ coin

The Royal Canadian Mint has launched a special glow-in-the-dark coin. The two dollar coin shows the traditional image of the Queen on one side and a canoe floating on a quiet lake in the Boreal forest with the glowing Northern Lights above on the other.

By: | Published: June 20, 2017 6:17 PM
The Royal Canadian Mint is releasing three million of these toonies to commemorate Canada’s 150th anniversary. (Image: The Royal Canadian Mint)

The Royal Canadian Mint has launched a special glow-in-the-dark coin. The two dollar coin, or toonie, as it’s known in Canada, shows the traditional image of the Queen on one side and a canoe floating on a quiet lake in the Boreal forest with the glowing Northern Lights above on the other.

The Royal Canadian Mint is releasing three million of these toonies to commemorate Canada’s 150th anniversary. The coin was designed by Timothy Hsia, a doctor from Richmond, British Columbia, who says he was inspired by the design contest’s theme, ‘Our wonders’.

“I wanted to choose a subject that was truly wonderful,” Mr Hsia said. “I feel like there is nothing more truly wonderful than Canada’s Northern Lights.”

Although it was Mr Hsia who created the design, it was the Mint that chose to make it glow in the dark, says spokesman Alex Reeves. The Royal Canadian Mint makes coins not only for Canadian circulation, but for about 75 countries around the world, and the coin is a bit of a calling card for the company, Mr Reeves said.

It is not the first time the Mint has gone for a glow-in-the-dark coin. In 2012, Canada created a quarter with a glowing Pachyrhinosaurus Lakustai dinosaur skeleton. That coin, which was not in general circulation, took home the Krause Publications 2014 Coin of the Year award for “most innovative coin”.

Back home, Reserve Bank of India also occasionally releases coins of special denominations such as 10, 50, 100 or even 1000, to commemorate special occasions. These coins are released in special sets for collectors. During the rule of the British Emperor, silver coins called ‘Rupya’ were circulated in large numbers in the Indian market. Each Rupya weighed almost 11.34 grams. After the independence of India, the first coin was issued in the year of 1950. The Government of India removed every sign of British colonial legacy from the coin except the English language and the Roman script.

After the independence of India, the first coin was issued in the year of 1950. The Government of India removed every sign of British colonial legacy from the coin except the English language and the Roman script.

Recently, RBI has announced that it will soon bring into circulation a new one Rupee note printed by the Government of India. Interestingly, the one Rupee note in India bears the signature of the finance secretary and not the RBI Governor as in the case with other denominations. Therefore, this new one Rupee note will have the signature of the recently retired finance secretary Shaktikanta Das.

  1. K
    Kanwal Jit
    Jun 20, 2017 at 6:51 pm
    The 1 Rupee note and other coins are issued by the Central Government and not by the Reserve Bank of India. Hence they are not on the RBI Balance Sheet
    Reply

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