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  1. Women’s March protesters blast Donald Trump as president touts gains

Women’s March protesters blast Donald Trump as president touts gains

Thousands of women and their male supporters turned out on Saturday for the second Women's March, a nationwide series of protests against U.S. President Donald Trump marking the end of his tumultuous first year in office.

By: | Washington | Published: January 21, 2018 4:37 AM
Donald Trump, womens march in US, news on donald trump, latest news on donald trump, US nationwide protest, New York, United States, Washington, Nancy Pelosi, US shutdown, white house The Republican president responded with a Twitter message touting the economic gains of the past year and how they benefited women. (Reuters)

Thousands of women and their male supporters turned out on Saturday for the second Women’s March, a nationwide series of protests against U.S. President Donald Trump marking the end of his tumultuous first year in office. The coordinated rallies in Washington, New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and about 250 other cities in the United States, as well as overseas locations, featured speaker after speaker blasting Trump for policies that many said hurt women and urging voters to turn out for congressional elections in November. The Republican president responded with a Twitter message touting the economic gains of the past year and how they benefited women. On Washington’s National Mall, a parade of Democratic leaders addressed a gathering that appeared much smaller than the massive crowd that flooded the nation’s capital on Jan. 21, 2017, the day after Trump’s inauguration.

“So while we have this president celebrating his one-year anniversary, let’s give him an ‘F’ (grade) for his performance,” House of Representatives Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said while flanked by fellow Democrats. “We don’t agonize, we organize.” Many of the Democrats focused on the shutdown of the U.S. government on Saturday in a funding dispute, saying the blame belonged to the Republicans, who control both chambers of Congress and the White House. Trump responded to the marchers with a tweet: “Beautiful weather all over our great country, a perfect day for all Women to March,” he wrote. “Get out there now to celebrate the historic milestones and unprecedented economic success and wealth creation that has taken place over the last 12 months. Lowest female unemployment in 18 years!”

Joblessness among women was 3.7 percent in December, below the overall U.S. unemployment rate of 4.1 percent, according to the Labor Department. But Katie O’Connor, a 39-year-old lawyer from Knoxville, Tennessee, who traveled to the National Mall, said she wanted Trump out as president. “I don’t believe this administration is going to do anything good for women,” she said. Many of the protesters wore pink knit “pussy hats,” which were created for last year’s march as a reference to a comment made by Trump about female genitalia, The caps quickly became a symbol of women’s empowerment and opposition to the new president in the early days of his administration. Saturday’s march came after what many see as a pivotal year for women’s rights, with the rise of the #MeToo and #TimesUp social media campaigns against sexual harassment and misconduct. The movements sprang up after a string of scandals involving powerful men in Hollywood, Washington and elsewhere.

SMALLER CROWD

While the Washington rally drew a sizable crowd, it was dwarfed by the size of last year’s Women’s March when the U.S. capital swarmed with demonstrators. There were no immediate estimates of the size of the Washington crowd this year. An estimated 5 million people participated in the nationwide rallies in 2017, making it one of the biggest protests in American history. In Chicago, thousands of mostly female marchers gathered in Grant Park, carrying protest signs with slogans such as “Strong women raising strong women.” Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan told the marchers, “You are powerful, use your power for progress, and, we are more powerful together.”

City officials had put the size of the crowd at between 200,000 and 300,000, or about the same as the 2017 rally, according to Fawzia Mirza, one of the emcees. But the streets did not appear as crowded as the year before. Michelle Saunders, 41, a software saleswoman from Des Plaines, Illinois, came to the rally with her 14-year-old daughter, Bailey. They attended last year’s march and for them the message was just as strong. “A smaller crowd will not mean people are any less angry,” Michelle Saunders said. “We are unhappy with the current administration and what it stands for, and want our voices to be heard.”

Since the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump has had sharply lower approval ratings among women than among men. A Pew Research Center poll in May showed 46 percent of men approving of Trump’s job performance, while only a third of women did. March organizers hope to build on the energy felt by Trump opponents after his surprise election victory in 2016 and channel it into gains for progressive candidates in November’s midterm elections, using the theme “Power to the Polls.”

Organizers want to register 1 million new voters and get more strong advocates for women’s rights into office. Activists say Trump’s policies rolling back birth control and equal pay protections have propelled many women into activism for the first time. In Virginia state legislative polls, 11 of the 15 newly elected Democrats were women.
The marches will be followed by more events on Sunday, including in Las Vegas, a key battleground state in the 2018 midterm congressional elections. The voter registration campaign will target swing states held by Republicans, such as Nevada, that could easily go to Democrats and in districts considered a toss-up ahead of November’s elections.

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