United States airlines bump fewer passengers after dragging backlash

By: | Published: August 9, 2017 3:12 AM

Following widespread outrage over a passenger who was violently dragged off an overbooked plane, US airlines are bumping customers at the lowest rate in at least two decades.

US airlines, US airlines NEWS, US airlines, US airlines 2017, US airlines backlash The Transportation Department said today that just one in every 19,000 passengers was kicked off an overbooked flight in the first six months of this year. (Representative Image: Reuters)

Following widespread outrage over a passenger who was violently dragged off an overbooked plane, US airlines are bumping customers at the lowest rate in at least two decades. The Transportation Department said today that just one in every 19,000 passengers was kicked off an overbooked flight in the first six months of this year. That’s the lowest rate since the government started keeping track in 1995.

The biggest decline took place between April and June, partly because airlines began paying many more passengers to give up their seats. Airlines have routinely overbooked flights for years in the expectation that some passengers won’t show up. When a flight is overbooked, airlines typically offer travel vouchers to encourage a few passengers to take a later flight. That practice backfired in April when United employees, whose offers of vouchers were ignored, asked Chicago airport officers to help remove four people from a United Express flight to make room for airline employees commuting to their next flight.

A 69-year-old man was dragged forcibly down the airplane aisle and other passengers captured the spectacle on camera phones, turning the incident into a public-relations disaster for United. Since then, United and other large US airlines have introduced new measures to reduce overbooking, and raised the maximum amount that passengers can be offered to give up a seat. Passengers still get bumped, however. Besides instances in which airlines sell too many seats, passengers may get booted when a mechanical breakdown causes an airline to use a smaller aircraft, or when the plane’s weight must be reduced for safe takeoff.

United Airlines spokeswoman Megan McCarthy said the carrier has sharply reduced bumping since the April incident. United booted 1,964 passengers in the first six months of 2017, with more in the second quarter than the first. However, McCarthy said, bumpings dropped from 957 in April to 61 in May and 46 in June. The Transportation Department did not provide a monthly breakdown.

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