Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos receives Nobel Peace Prize

By: | Published: December 10, 2016 10:40 PM

Colombia's peace deal between the government and the Marxist FARC rebels is a model for war-torn countries like Syria, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said today as he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize.

The peace accord, signed on November 24 to end five decades of conflict, is a "model for the resolution of armed conflicts that have yet to be resolved around the world." (Reuters)The peace accord, signed on November 24 to end five decades of conflict, is a “model for the resolution of armed conflicts that have yet to be resolved around the world.” (Reuters)

Colombia’s peace deal between the government and the Marxist FARC rebels is a model for war-torn countries like Syria, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said today as he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize.

The peace accord, signed on November 24 to end five decades of conflict, is a “model for the resolution of armed conflicts that have yet to be resolved around the world.”

“It proves that what, at first, seems impossible, through perseverance may become possible even in Syria or Yemen or South Sudan,” Santos said during a lavish ceremony at Oslo’s City Hall, decked out in red, orange and white roses and carnations imported from Colombia for the occasion.

After a first peace deal was rejected in a popular vote on October 2, the rebels and government negotiated a new accord to end the conflict, which has killed more than 260,000 people, left 45,000 missing and forced nearly seven million to flee their homes.

“The Colombian peace agreement is a ray of hope in a world troubled by so many conflicts and so much intolerance,” he said.

Yet in an interview with AFP just hours before today’s prize ceremony, Santos acknowledged that the hardest part of the country’s peace process was yet to come.

The period ahead “is a more difficult phase than the (negotiation) process itself, and will require a lot of effort, perseverance and humility,” he said.

“A lot of coordination efforts will also be needed… to bring the benefits of peace to the regions that have suffered the most in the conflict,” he added.

He also said he could offer no guarantees there would be a peace deal in place with Colombia’s second-largest rebel group, the National Liberation Army (ELN), before the end of his mandate in 2018.

“I will do my best but to establish a time frame is always counter-productive in negotiations of this sort,” he said.
In a speech at the ceremony, Berit Reiss-Andersen, deputy chairwoman of the Nobel committee, urged “all sides in Colombia to carry on the national dialogue and continue on the road to reconciliation.

“Hopefully, a similar negotiated disarmament agreement with the ELN guerrilla will soon be in place as well.”

The Nobel prize consists of a gold medal, a diploma and a cheque for eight million Swedish kronor (824,000 euros, USD 871,000), a sum Santos promised to donate to the victims of the war.

Later today, another ceremony will be held in Stockholm where the Nobel laureates in the sciences, economics and literature will be honoured – a ceremony marked by the notable absence of this year’s literature laureate, Bob Dylan.

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