1998 al Qaida bombing of US embassies: US Supreme Court allows bigger award in case that killed 224 people

By: |
Published: May 18, 2020 9:57:26 PM

The case the Supreme Court ruled in involves lawsuits filed by victims and their families against Sudan that accused the country of causing the bombings by aiding al-Qaida and leader Osama bin Laden, who lived in Sudan in the 1990s.

The nearly simultaneous truck bombings at the embassies killed 224 people and injured thousands. They were the first major attacks on US targets by al-Qaida. (Reuters)

The US Supreme Court is allowing a bigger award of money to victims of the 1998 bombings by al-Qaida of the US embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Despite the court’s ruling, however, it’s unlikely the victims will ever collect the full amount. The nearly simultaneous truck bombings at the embassies killed 224 people and injured thousands. They were the first major attacks on US targets by al-Qaida.

The case the Supreme Court ruled in involves lawsuits filed by victims and their families against Sudan that accused the country of causing the bombings by aiding al-Qaida and leader Osama bin Laden, who lived in Sudan in the 1990s.

The more than 500 people involved in the case are mostly foreign citizens, either US government employees or contractors injured in the bombings or relatives of those who died.

A court initially awarded the group more than $10 billion, but an appeals court threw out $4 billion of the award that was punitive damages. The Supreme Court unanimously vacated the appeals court’s ruling on Monday.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE, NSE, US Market and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Financial Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel and stay updated with the latest Biz news and updates.

Next Stories
1Google stands in support of racial equality, says Sundar Pichai
2Violent protests engulf US, thousands arrested and nearly 40 cities under curfew
3‘I Can’t Breathe’ protests reach White House: President Trump taken to emergency security bunker, says report