Letters to the editor: Canvassing China

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Published: November 22, 2014 12:09:41 AM

Apropos of the column “The world keeps coming to China” (FE, November 17), having a presence in the...

Canvassing China
Apropos of the column “The world keeps coming to China” (FE, November 17), having a presence in the world’s second-largest economy has come to seem indispensable for ambitious business schools from across the world. Just as having a presence in China has come to seem indispensable for internationally ambitious Western companies, so business schools are feeling the magnetic pull of the world’s second-largest economy. New alliances between Western schools and Chinese universities are springing up in increasing numbers. Further, China’s appeal, rightly, also reflects economic forces. Its GDP growth has slowed, but is still on course to reach over 7% this year and next. That is far more dynamic than in austerity-battered Europe, giving the continent’s business schools an incentive to seek out expanding markets. However, whether alliances with China and other emerging markets offer the answer to ailing business schools’ broader commercial challenges remains unclear. Lastly, whatever gains schools anticipate from their forays into China, exclusivity is unlikely to be one of them.
Bhopal Singh Verma
Gurgaon

Maharashtra conundrum
If the current scenario continues, it is not going to be easy for the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government in Maharashtra to remain in power for long. It is a minority government and to muster majority it has to try and get support from either the Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) or the Shiv Sena. It is difficult for the BJP to accept NCP as an ally. The BJP would have liked to take up the alleged corruption cases against the NCP. It cannot do that if the NCP joins the BJP. The BJP’s ‘natural ally’ is the Shiv Sena. If and when the alliance is formed, the BJP would expect the Shiv Sena to play a secondary role. The Shiv Sena, which has been a dominant partner of the BJP, may not like to change this equation. The Shiv Sena has many demands. It wants the deputy chief minister’s post to be given to its party MLA. It wants plum posts in the government. It has strong differences with the government with regard to the state’s policies and programmes. For instance, it is strongly opposed to the creation of the separate state of Vidarbha. There will always be a veiled threat. Is there a way out? The BJP leaders have said that they will do their best to avoid mid-term polls. But can they avoid it?
Bhagwan Thadani
Mumbai

Good gesture
Thankfully, the saga of the five Indian fishermen on death row in Sri Lanka had a happy ending. The joy of the released fishermen and their families knew no bounds when they were reunited after a gap of over two years. Whether the gesture sprang from geopolitical compulsions or humanitarian impulses, it was good and paved the way for tackling neighbourly disputes with sympathy and understanding. With the larger question of fishing rights in the Palk Strait region still remaining unresolved, Sri Lankan authorities should be considerate enough to refrain from taking Indian fishermen into custody, slapping false charges on them as in the case of the released fishermen and roughing them up in Sri Lankan prisons. When it comes to the issue of Indian fishermen’s livelihood, Sri Lankan government should not let itself be influenced by the deep resentment it feels at Tamil Nadu’s solidarity with the island’s ethnic Tamils. Hostility to Indian fishermen because of their identity as Tamils is unjustified and eminently avoidable. Both Colombo and New Delhi must strive to create and put in place mechanism to ensure that fishermen of both the countries fish on and around international maritime boundary line in a spirit of good neighbourliness.
G David Milton
Maruthancode, Tamil Nadu

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