Letters to the editor

By: | Published: August 30, 2016 6:20 AM

This refers to the editorial “Ill-conceived Bill” (FE, August 29). The Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 proposes to regulate surrogacy by establishing a National Surrogacy Board at the central level, chaired by the health minister, and State Surrogacy Boards and appropriate authorities in the states and union territories.

Surrogacy & reproductive rights

This refers to the editorial “Ill-conceived Bill” (FE, August 29). The Surrogacy (Regulation) Bill, 2016 proposes to regulate surrogacy by establishing a National Surrogacy Board at the central level, chaired by the health minister, and State Surrogacy Boards and appropriate authorities in the states and union territories.

The Bill also envisages imprisonment for a term not less than 10 years and with a fine up to Rs.10 lakh in case any establishment is found undertaking commercial surrogacy, abandoning the child, exploiting the surrogate mother, selling or importing a human embryo.

The Bill is welcome as it not only views surrogacy from the frame of immorality or commodification but also identifies surrogate mothers as victims who are not merely wombs available for commercial exploitation.

However, the government seems to have faltered in recognising surrogacy parenting as a logical extension to the right to procreate which should be a part of the constitutional right to privacy.

It provides an alternative to couples who cannot naturally have children, lack other assisted reproductive technology options, are keen to have a biological child, and can find a surrogate mother among their relatives.

It is unfortunate that a country that values the right of its citizens to reproduce without interference of the state has come to the point of passing such a law.

It is time it stopped indulging in moral policing by drumming up the “country’s values have to be kept in mind” rhetoric.

Shreyans Jain, Delhi

The UPI revolution

This refers to “WhatsApp moment for banking” (FE, August 29). UPI is indeed a big leap in connectivity.

NPCI has done a commendable job and richly deserves kudos for it. For an army personnel, money will reach in a jiffy to their dear ones, even in the furthest corner of the country, via UPI.

During the annual flooding in Assam, funds will reach through UPI when there are problems acessing a branch or an ATM is inaccessible, on account of, say, roads getting washed away or a blackout.

As a kid in Bayana, a small town of Rajasthan, in the early 1960s, I used to wait for the R20-money-order from my older brother who was an Air Force officer posted in the North East, to buy pencils, note-books, children magazines and shoe-whitener.

The wait was was rather long but was a still a thrill. Now, we both welcome UPI and are hopeful that the convenience it brings proves a game-changer.

UPI will be definitely a robust and effective cart for rural populations in multiple ways. Years ago, on the banks of rivers in the South, I had seen how SMSes about the availability and price of fish near a particular shore were sent to fellow-fishermen and price stability was ensured. Now, payment can be made through UPI.

With the introduction of major rural-oriented government schemes and the advent of proposed payments and small banks, UPI can be game-changer for villagers.

Further, the most important point to scale up utility quotient is the tailored content which has to be in local language.

It is vital for for the growth of e-governance, government-to- citizen engagement and e-commerce sites. Through UPI, even the Atal Pension Scheme for the unorganised sector could boom.

NK Bakshi

Ahmedabad

Get live Stock Prices from BSE and NSE and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Switch to Hindi Edition