Crude oil prices rise on Libyan export disruption, but markets remain weak

By: | Published: December 11, 2018 8:39 AM

Oil prices on Tuesday clawed back some of their losses from the previous day as Libya's National Oil Company declared force majeure on exports from the El Sharara oilfield, which was seized at the weekend by a local militia group.

crude oil, crude oil prices, oil prices, oil market, commodities, rate of crude oilInternational Brent crude oil futures were at .30 per barrel at 0206 GMT, up 33 cents, or 0.6 percent, from their last close.

Oil prices on Tuesday clawed back some of their losses from the previous day as Libya’s National Oil Company declared force majeure on exports from the El Sharara oilfield, which was seized at the weekend by a local militia group.

Despite that, overall sentiment on oil prices remained weak amid worries over global stock markets and doubts that planned supply cuts led by producer club OPEC will be enough to rein in oversupply. International Brent crude oil futures were at $60.30 per barrel at 0206 GMT, up 33 cents, or 0.6 percent, from their last close.

U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $51.19 per barrel, up 19 cents, or 0.4 percent, from their last settlement. Libya’s National Oil Company (NOC) late on Monday declared force majeure on exports from the El Sharara oilfield, the country’s biggest, which was seized at the weekend by a militia group. NOC said the shutdown would result in a production loss of 315,000 barrels per day (bpd), and an additional loss of 73,000 bpd at the El Feel oilfield.

READ ALSO | Don’t celebrate yet! Petrol, diesel prices could go up again; here’s why

The rise came after crude prices dropped by 3 percent the session before amid ongoing weakness in global stock markets and concerns that slowing oil demand-growth could erode supply cuts announced last week by the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and some non-OPEC producers including Russia. Crude futures have lost around a third of their value since early October amid the financial market slump and an emerging oil supply overhang.

In physical markets, Kuwait and Iran this week both reduced their January crude oil supply prices to Asia “There remains a lot of uncertainty if the production cut is thick enough to make a significant dent in global supply,” said Stephen Innes, head of trading for Asia-Pacific at futures brokerage Oanda in Singapore.

“The general risk-off tone in global markets and the stronger dollar … are contributing to the selling pressure.” The OPEC-led group of oil producers last Friday announced a supply cut of 1.2 million barrels per day (bpd) in crude oil supply from January, measured against October 2018 output levels.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE and NSE and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Switch to Hindi Edition