Artemis 1: From launch to re-entry into Earth’s orbit, here’s how NASA has planned mission to moon | The Financial Express

Artemis 1: From launch to re-entry into Earth’s orbit, here’s how NASA has planned mission to moon

NASA’s upcoming mission, known as the ARTEMIS 1 mission, is expected to launch on August 29, 2022. It will be the first step toward sending humans back to the Moon since the Apollo program ended over half a century ago.

Artemis 1: From launch to re-entry into Earth’s orbit, here’s how NASA has planned mission to moon
The spacecraft will travel to the Moon and deploy small satellites.

NASA’s upcoming mission, known as the ARTEMIS 1 mission, is expected to launch on August 29, 2022. It will be the first step toward sending humans back to the Moon since the Apollo program ended over half a century ago. The unmanned mission will be carrying the agency’s Orion Crew Capsule and the Space Launch System.

The spacecraft will travel to the Moon and deploy small satellites. It will then settle into orbit around the lunar surface. NASA aims to practice performing operations and testing the conditions that astronauts will experience when they travel to the Moon to assure that it is safe for any occupants to stay and then return to Earth.

Artemis I Launch as planned

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch with four solid-core engines and five-segment boosters and will produce a maximum of more than 3.9 million kilograms of thrust. After the launch, the various components of the rocket, including the launch abort system and the service module, will be discarded. The core stage will then be separated from the spacecraft.

Artemis I’s way to the lunar orbit and deep-sea mission

After the launch, the Orion spacecraft will deploy its solar panels and orbit the Earth. It will then be separated from the Interim Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (ICPS), which will allow it to leave Earth’s orbit and go toward a natural satellite i.e. the moon. About two hours following the launch, the two spacecraft will separate on reaching the trajectory of the moon.

After separation at the lunar orbit, the ICPS will deploy a couple of CubeSats. These will be used to send experimental and scientific payloads into deep space. One of these will be BioSentinel, which will be carrying yeast to study the effects of space radiation on living matter. The other CubeSats will also perform many science and technology demonstrations.

Artemis I: Service module and experiments on lunar surface

The service module that will propel Orion to the Moon has been built by the European Space Agency, which is known for its work on space missions. Besides providing the necessary power and propulsion for the spacecraft, the module will also provide water and air for future crewed missions.

After it enters the orbit of the Moon, Orion will stay there for around six days to collect data and perform various tests. It will then get very close to the lunar surface and use the service module’s engine firing to accelerate back to Earth. This will be done in combination with lunar gravity.

Artemis I: How it will return to Earth

After carrying out a mission of traversing a distance of 3 million kilometres for over six weeks, Orion will return to Earth and burn through the atmosphere at around 40,000 kilometres per hour. During its descent, it will generate temperatures of up to 3,000 degrees Celsius. If all goes according to plan, it will land in the sea near a recovery ship that’s currently docked on the coast of California.

After landing, the Orion spacecraft will remain powered for a couple of hours to allow a group of US Navy divers and members of the NASA exploration ground system to approach it. The Navy team will first inspect the aircraft before sending the capsule towards the recovery ship.

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