Man vs Tiger: Big cats in Ranthambore turning aggressive! Attacks on humans spike

By: |
February 24, 2020 4:01 PM

The tigers at Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) are becoming more aggressive as their population increases and growing tourism, Hindustan Times quoted a report.

In the last two years, there have been many incidents involving a human-tiger conflict.

The tigers at Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) are becoming more aggressive as their population increases and growing tourism, Hindustan Times quoted a report. In the last two years, there have been many incidents involving a human-tiger conflict that had cost four people their lives, the report said. RTR has submitted a report highlighting the possible reason for tigers to behave in this manner. According to the report, the tiger reserve has also recommended some measures that will help strengthen managing wildlife and curb human-tiger conflict.

The report further said that these incidents have increased, especially on Sawai Madhopur district border, in Rajasthan. About a year ago, the incidents were not major as the tigers simply moved within forests and its bordering areas. However, in the last one year, the behavioural change has been radical, the report said, adding that the conflicts have started costing the loss of life as well as property.

According to the report, this can mainly be attributed to growing tourism. The number of tourism vehicles have exceeded in a while and are running above their capacity. Moreover, low height or damaged security walls is also one of the reasons.

The report also suggested that the incidents are likely to increase more in the future. In the total population of 62 tigers at Ranthambore Tiger Reserve, 27 are males, 25 are females and 10 cubs. These cubs, when grown, are likely to add to the conflict incidents. If this happens, an immediate need for moving 10 tigers from the reserve is likely. Till now, one has been relocated to Udaipur, one to Mukundra and another one to Sariska. Before this, six tigers have been shifted to Sariska.

Meanwhile, the report, citing Wildlife Institute of India scientist YV Jhala, said that if animals are not afraid of humans, then the conflict between the two will increase. It should be ensured that the animals fear humans and practices that make sure animals fear humans should be followed.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE, NSE, US Market and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Financial Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel and stay updated with the latest Biz news and updates.

Next Stories
1Monsoon withdrawal likely to begin next week: IMD
2Emissions to add 15 inches to global sea level rise by 2100: NASA-led study
3Solar Cycle 25 explained: Sun commences journey of new solar cycle