Kudos! IIIT Hyderabad researchers develop tool to count trees, generate density maps

By: |
July 08, 2021 2:23 PM

The computer-vision-aided tool for object detection works on the basis of a machine-learning algorithm, which automatically detects and counts the trees.

green cover, tree countThe team now hopes to employ the system in different cities to understand the model’s large-scale efficacy. (Picture courtesy: Indian Express)

As cities and towns embark on a rapid development drive at the expense of their precious green cover, researchers from Hyderabad’s Indian Institute of Information Technology (IIIT) have developed a method that would enable them to scientifically count trees and generate density maps. All that is required to generate a tree count and density map is to ride across the city with only a basic camera that will record videos and reveal the result within minutes.

The computer-vision-aided tool for object detection works on the basis of a machine-learning algorithm, which automatically detects and counts the trees. It then generates a colour-coded map of the city to highlight the extent of tree cover along routes. Arpit Bahety, a 23-year-old research fellow at the institute’s Center for Visual Information Technology lab, tested the tool using footage from a GoPro camera that was mounted on a helmet on the back seat of his scooter. A similar experiment was conducted in Gujarat’s Surat as well, this time using footage from a Samsung mobile phone. The system managed an 83 per cent accuracy during the trials in these two cities.

The researchers developed a machine learning model, which can detect trees at once. This platform also avoids duplication, a common error when many trees are manually counted. Speaking to Indian Express Online, Bahety said the camera can be mounted on any vehicle and it will detect tress. The only catch is that the camera has to be facing left. The camera will detect the tree based on the trunk. The video is then fed into a system that generates a map, enabling them to know the green cover of different areas. Over 50 trees a kilometre would be considered a good count, while anything lower than 20 would be low. The map denotes areas of good tree count with dark green those with a low count in black.

The team now hopes to employ the system in different cities to understand the model’s large-scale efficacy. It believes the tool could also help assess urban afforestation efforts.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE, NSE, US Market and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, Check out latest IPO News, Best Performing IPOs, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Financial Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel and stay updated with the latest Biz news and updates.

Next Stories
1Russia’s Nauka module set to integrate with International Space Station this week: What we know so far
2World Nature Conservation Day July 28: Persevere to Preserve – There is no Plan(et) B
3Heavy rain lashes Delhi, extensive waterlogging in several parts