Curiosity rover’s Mars trip begins, will uncover insights about the climate of the Red planet

By: |
Published: July 8, 2020 6:21 PM

The next part of the mission is a mountain known as Mountain Sharp. The mission assumes significance as it will entail the analysis on the sediments present on the Mountain Sharp.

In its recent cache of images, the Mars rover has sent a total of 116 images.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Curiosity Mars rover’s summer trip has begun. On this trip on Martian surface, the Mars rover is pegged to cover a distance of 1.6 kilometre in a complete year. After the trip commenced on July 6, it has sent a group of images of its new destination, according to an IE report. The underlying plan of the mission is to avoid getting stuck in a huge patch of sand before it begins its next part of the mission. The next part of the mission is a mountain known as Mountain Sharp. The mission assumes significance as it will entail the analysis on the sediments present on the Mountain Sharp.

In its recent cache of images, the Mars rover has sent a total of 116 images. The images constitute the path that the rover will follow to reach the floor of the Gale Crater. The mission then will bring crucial information about climate change that is believed to have taken place 3 million years ago. It is also said that the trip on the Mountain Sharp’s sedimentary layer will also reveal the truth behind the Red planet. It may give insights about the planet which was once like the Earth planet with oceans, lakes etcetera and then turned into a dead frozen desert.

The speed of the Mars rover is expected to hover between 25 metres to 100 metres per hour. Earlier, the scientists have concluded the exploration of the lower part of the mountain. The scientists had named the lower side as a “clay bearing unit” as it showed the large amount of clay minerals.

In view of the lack of imagery of the track to be taken by the rover, the trip will be taken with the help of the rover’s automated driving abilities. The rover’s automatic driving skills helps it to avoid large rocks or difficult terrains, Matt Gildner, lead rover driver at JPL was quoted as saying by IE.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE, NSE, US Market and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Financial Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel and stay updated with the latest Biz news and updates.

Next Stories
1Gaganyaan: Astronauts-elect complete training on abnormal descent module landing in Russia
2Is compensatory afforestation on Yamuna floodplain ‘unscientific’? Green panel to find out
3EIA Draft notification does not relax process of public hearing: Prakash Javadekar