Antarctica iceberg break off: Here is all you need to know

By: | Updated: July 13, 2017 9:31 AM

A massive iceberg has broken away from Antarctica. The Trillion-tonne iceberg is considered as the one of the largest ever

Antarctica iceberg, Antarctica iceberg news, what is Antarctica iceberg, Larsen C Ice Shelf, A68, A massive iceberg has broken away from Antarctica. The Trillion-tonne iceberg is considered as the one of the largest ever. (Reuters image)

A massive iceberg has broken away from Antarctica. The Trillion-tonne iceberg is considered as the one of the largest ever, according to report. Now maritime traffic around South Pole may be disrupted due to this iceberg. The 5,800 square kilometre iceberg left the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica and has changed the landscape of the region. Generally, icebergs do break away from Antarctica but this one is being given importance due to its size, the report says. It has been learned the event took place between July 10 and 12.

Here is all you need to know

The iceberg is likely to be named A68 and its volume is twice that of Lake Erie, one of the Great Lakes.

The final breakthrough of the rift was detected in data from NASA’s Aqua MODIS satellite instrument, which images in the thermal infrared at a resolution of one kilometre and confirmed by NASA’s Suomi VIIRS instrument. The development of the rift over the last year was monitored using data from the European Space Agency Sentinel-1 satellites – part of the European Copernicus Space Component.

NASA and European Space Agency satellites have been monitoring the shelf _ offering dramatic pictures of the break that heightened interest beyond the scientific community. The final break was first revealed in a thermal infrared image from NASA’s Aqua MODIS satellite instrument, as per AP report.

Although the remaining ice shelf will continue naturally to regrow, researchers have previously shown that the new configuration is potentially less stable than it was prior to the rift. There is a risk that Larsen C may eventually follow the example of its neighbour, Larsen B, which disintegrated in 2002 following a similar rift-induced calving event in 1995, a PTI report says.

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The Larsen C Ice Shelf, which has a thickness of between 200 and 600 metres, floats on the ocean at the edge of The Antarctic Peninsula, holding back the flow of glaciers that feed into it. While the new iceberg will not immediately raise sea levels, if the shelf loses much more of its area, it could result in glaciers that flow off the land behind speeding up their passage towards the ocean.

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