​​​
  1. Skin microbes could fight common STDs

Skin microbes could fight common STDs

A particular microorganism living on the human skin can effectively clear bacteria that cause chancroid, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) common in the developing world that has been linked to enhanced HIV transmission, a new study has found.

By: | Published: September 16, 2015 6:28 PM

A particular microorganism living on the human skin can effectively clear bacteria that cause chancroid, a sexually transmitted disease (STD) common in the developing world that has been linked to enhanced HIV transmission, a new study has found.

For years, researchers have known that the human skin is home to a diverse community of microorganisms, collectively known as the skin microbiome.

The study is the first prospective study to show that the skin microbiome can influence the outcomes of a bacterial infection, researchers said.

“What we found from this study is that people who resolve infections start off with microbiomes that resemble each other,” said lead author Stanley Spinola, professor and chair, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Indiana University School of Medicine in US.

“People who form abscesses in response to infection have different microbiomes that don’t resemble each other preinfection, but during an infection, they get driven to one composition,” Spinola said.

“If the bacteria in the resolvers are actually contributing to the host defence, you could think about using bacteria as a probiotic to help prevent infection or you could use the microbiome to identify people at risk for certain infections,” Spinola said.

Researchers have hypothesised that some resident bacteria can protect the skin from infection by outcompeting pathogens for resources or by priming the immune system’s response to invaders.

Until now, however, no prospective study has evaluated the influence of the skin microbiome on the susceptibility to or protection from infection.

In the study, researchers evaluated the skin microbiome of eight individuals before, during, and after inoculation with Haemophilus ducreyi on the arm.

In addition to chancroid, this bacteria has emerged as a major cause of skin ulcers in children in equatorial Africa and the South Pacific, so infection of the arm is relevant to its biology.

Infected individuals can either clear the infection or develop pustules that eventually form abscesses.

The researchers compared the skin microbiome in patients who resolved their H ducreyi infection to those who did not.

The researchers discovered that preinfection skin microbiomes of pustule formers and resolvers have distinct community structures that change in response to the progression of H ducreyi infection.

The study was published in the journal mBio.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE and NSE and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Tags: Hiv

Go to Top