COVID-19: UK to resume Coronavirus prevention trial of Hydroxychloroquine; details

By: |
Published: June 30, 2020 6:48 PM

Health agencies across the world are reviewing various options to at least limit the spread of the disease or protect the lives of people who have already caught the infection.

World Health Organisation had announced that it will supervise the resumption of Hydroxychloroquine trials.

A global trial for the assessment of the role that Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine can play against COVID-19 infection is set to resume in the United Kingdom, reported news agency Reuters. The resumption of the widely-debated trial has begun following approval by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) after the trial named as COPCOV was halted as following reports of lack of effectiveness shown by Hydroxychloroquine people who had contracted the coronavirus.

The COPCOV trial has been launched as a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to register 40,000 healthcare employees and other people who are at high risk from the coronavirus across the world. The trial was launched by the Bangkok-based Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU) of Oxford University.

BBC quoted one of the leaders of the research, Prof Sir Nicholas White from the University of Oxford saying that randomised controlled trial is needed to determine the role Hydroxychloroquine can play in prevention of coronavirus infection.

Earlier this month, the World Health Organisation had announced that it will supervise the resumption of Hydroxychloroquine trials after banning the initial trial based on a case report published in The Lancet peer-reviewed journal.

Hydroxychloroquine was touted as the game-changer drug against the coronavirus infection by US President Donald Trump. He had gone on to confirm of him using it as a prophylactic drug in the wake of the Covid-19 in the United States.

Earlier on June 29, the result of the Recovery trail trial that was launched in March to study the impact of lopinavir-ritonavir drug combination which is generally used against HIV was released. Based on over 11,800 patients who were enrolled from 176 NHS hospitals in the UK for the trial, the group of researchers has concluded that the anti-HIV drug has no real clinical benefits on the patients who were hospitalised due to the coronavirus disease.

The researchers of the same Recovery trial had declared the low-dose steroid treatment dexamethasone as a potential breakthrough against the highly-contagious virus. The group of researchers went a step ahead to declare that if the UK had used dexamethasone since the start of the pandemic in the country, up to 5,000 lives could have been saved.

Health agencies across the world are reviewing various options to at least limit the spread of the disease or protect the lives of people who have already caught the infection. The coronavirus pandemic has left more than 10 million people across the world infected while more than half a million has succumbed to the virus.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE, NSE, US Market and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Financial Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel and stay updated with the latest Biz news and updates.

Next Stories
1Pakistan Foreign Minister Mehmood Qureshi tests positive for COVID-19
2Covid-19: Women with history of pregnancy not eligible to donate plasma in Delhi, doctors tell why
3Covaxin Covid-19 vaccine: ICMR aims for August 15 launch, health experts say “unrealistic deadline”