COVID-19 patients could suffer cognitive deficits equal to brain ageing by 10 years, says study

By: |
October 28, 2020 12:31 PM

The research, led by Imperial College London doctor Adam Hampshire, has studied over 84,000 people.

The team studied the Great British Intelligence Test of as many as 84,285 people.

COVID-19 impact: COVID-19 could lead to mental decline! The novel coronavirus has brought with itself several aspects, and scientists are finding new things related to it everyday. Now, researchers have warned that having coronavirus infection could lead to significant impact on the brain functions, according to a report by news agency Reuters. The report also added that in the worst cases, it could also cause mental decline equal to ageing of the brain by a decade. The study is yet to be peer reviewed.

The research, led by Imperial College London doctor Adam Hampshire, has studied over 84,000 people. It has been found that the infection can cause significant cognitive deficit for months in some severe cases. The researchers stated that their findings and analysis are in alignment with the view that contracting COVID-19 can lead to chronic cognitive impacts. They also said that post-recovery patients, including those who did not show symptoms any longer, were found to be suffering from such deficits, the report stated.

The team studied the Great British Intelligence Test of as many as 84,285 people. In cognitive tests, brain functions like joining-the-dot puzzles and remembering words are tested. These tests help in assessment of brain performance and are helpful in finding any temporary impairments as well. Researchers said that the cognitive deficits were substantial, especially among those who were hospitalised due to COVID-19.

However, scientists who were not related to the study have expressed apprehension towards the results and have asked to view them with caution.

The report quoted applied neuroimaging professor at Edinburgh University Joanna Wardlaw as saying that the team did not know of the cognitive abilities of the patients before they contracted COVID-19. The professor added that the long-term recovery was also not reflected in the results, which meant that the impact of the disease could be short-term.

Meanwhile, University College London’s medical imaging science professor Derek Hill stated that the study has not compared before and after scores. Hill further stated that the team’s study group also included a large number of people who did not have a positive test and had only self-reported that they had COVID-19.

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