LinkedIn brings new policy to allow employees to opt out of full-time work from office

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July 30, 2021 1:27 PM

Tech companies were the first ones to respond to the critical need of the pandemic and had switched quickly to remote working when the cases had first started rising.

Hanson said that the company was expecting to see more remote employees after this policy than what it had been witnessing before the pandemic struck.

LinkedIn: In a major move, professional social networking site LinkedIn has decided to let employees opt for full-time work from home or hybrid working as per their wish as offices are beginning to reopen. The decision was shared by Chief People Officer Teuila Hanson. The announcement of the new policy is key because it puts to rest the speculation based on an indication from last October that the employees of the Microsoft-owned platform would be expected to work from office 50% of the time after lifting of restrictions. With this updated policy, the over 16,000 employees of LinkedIn all over the world would get to choose whether they want to work from home full time, or from office part time, giving them a flexible working environment.

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Hanson said that the company was expecting to see more remote employees after this policy than what it had been witnessing before the pandemic struck, but added that some jobs would need people to be present in office. He also clarified that at the moment, the company did not require employees to be vaccinated against coronavirus in order to return to the office, contrary to tech giants Google and Facebook that are requiring their employees to be vaccinated as a response to the increasing number of COVID-19 cases in the US. This surge has even caused microblogging site Twitter to close its offices even as they had been reopened only recently.

However, LinkedIn corporate communications director Greg Snapper said that employees who have moved locations might witness an adjustment in their pay based on the place where they are living.

Tech companies were the first ones to respond to the critical need of the pandemic and had switched quickly to remote working when the cases had first started rising, but now that offices are reopening, the tech companies are differing in their strategies. While some companies like Reddit and Zillow Group have decided to allow most of their employees to work from home – likely in an effort to lead what they perceive to be the new normal in the work culture – iPhone maker Apple has asked its employees to work from the office three days a week starting in October. Meanwhile, tech giant Google is expecting 60% of the employees to work from the office on at least a part-time basis.

It is yet to be known when the pandemic would be behind us, but people all over the world are expecting a significant work culture change as companies as well as employees have noticed the way in which things can function even if people are out of office, and especially with the extra time that they have due to not having to commute. However, whether companies decide to stick to this cultural change or whether they are thinking of going back is yet to be determined. The way things currently stand, though, it seems that a lot of offices can also choose to adopt a hybrid strategy rather than going back to a stringent work from office rule.

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