Going green: Now, ‘organic’ bendable smartphone that will be biodegradable

By: |
October 7, 2018 6:52 PM

Scientists of Australian National University (ANU) have developed flexible, thin semiconductor which has parts made of organic materials and it can efficiently turn electricity into light.

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Scientists of Australian National University (ANU) have developed flexible, thin semiconductor which has parts made of organic materials and it can efficiently turn electricity into light. Scientists have also noted that the invention can actually pave way for bendable smartphones!

The researchers at ANU, through the invention, thus open a door for a new-gen high performing electronic device that will be biodegradable, and also pave way for reducing the e-waste.

The amount of e-waste generated across the world every year is proving to be one of the major reasons behind environmental degradation – causing irreversible damage to this planet.

The organic parts of the semiconductor is formed out of a single atom thick layer of carbon and hydrogen, whereas the inorganic component is two atom thick. The hybrid structure has proved to be an excellent converter of electricity to light – which can be developed into bendable smart phones, televisions and other electronic devices

Larry Lu, an associate professor of ANU told PTI, that such ultra-thin electronics component with excellent semiconducting properties has been developed for the first time. The thin, flexible organic-inorganic hybrid structure will pave way for future technologies, such as bendable mobile phones and display screens. “We characterised the optoelectronic and electrical properties of our invention to confirm the tremendous potential of it to be used as a future semiconductor component,” he further added.

A PhD researcher of the university has pointed out how the hybrid semiconductor might prove to be more efficient than the conventional semiconductors. “This invention has the potential to make mobile phones as powerful as today’s supercomputers,” said Sharma the PhD researcher.

He further explained that the light emission from the invented semi conductor devices is sharp, and can even be used for high-resolution displays, and because it is a few atoms thick, it will be super-flexible, paving way for smartphones with bendable screens.

The team of researchers in ANU has built the semiconductor ‘module by module’ much like 3D printing through a process called chemical vapour deposition.

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