China accused of using Twitter, Facebook against Hong Kong protests

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Updated: August 20, 2019 11:00:17 AM

The California-based micro-messaging service is blocked in mainland China, so many of the accounts accessed it using "virtual private networks" that give a deceptive picture of the user's location.

Hong Kong protests, twitter, facebook, social media platforms, China, Chinese government, Nathaniel GleicherFacebook said a tip from Twitter led to the removal of a network of pages, groups and accounts originating in China and involved in “coordinated inauthentic behaviour” focusing on Hong Kong. (Reuters photo)

Twitter and Facebook have said they had uncovered a campaign by China to use the social media platforms against pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. “We are disclosing a significant state-backed information operation focused on the situation in Hong Kong, specifically the protest movement and their calls for political change,” Twitter said in an online post on Monday. Facebook said a tip from Twitter led to the removal of a network of pages, groups and accounts originating in China and involved in “coordinated inauthentic behaviour” focusing on Hong Kong. Twitter said it suspended 936 accounts that originated in China.

The California-based micro-messaging service is blocked in mainland China, so many of the accounts accessed it using “virtual private networks” that give a deceptive picture of the user’s location. “Based on our intensive investigations, we have reliable evidence to support that this is a coordinated state-backed operation,” Twitter said.

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“We identified large clusters of accounts behaving in a coordinated manner to amplify messages related to the Hong Kong protests.” Facebook removed seven pages, three groups and five accounts originating in mainland China deemed to be part of an influence campaign focused on Hong Kong, according to cybersecurity policy head Nathaniel Gleicher.

People running the campaign used “deceptive tactics” including fake accounts to pose as news organisations, spread content and steer people to news sites, Gleicher said. “They frequently posted about local political news and issues including topics like the ongoing protests in Hong Kong,” Gleicher said.

“Although the people behind this activity attempted to conceal their identities, our investigation found links to individuals associated with the Chinese government.” About 15,500 accounts followed at least one of the campaign’s Facebook pages, according to the social network.

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