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  1. Intel PC ad: Ek Kadam Unnati ki Aur; a hackneyed idea

Intel PC ad: Ek Kadam Unnati ki Aur; a hackneyed idea

The ad film is a true story about how Intel-powered devices have enabled textile designers in Chanderi, Ashoknagar, Madhya Pradesh to modernise the dying craft of Chanderi saree-making.

By: | Published: July 5, 2016 6:32 AM
India may have the second largest smartphone consumer base. Prime Minister Narendra Modi might be promoting for a ‘Digital India’. India may have the second largest smartphone consumer base. Prime Minister Narendra Modi might be promoting for a ‘Digital India’.

The Ad
The ad film is a true story about how Intel-powered devices have enabled textile designers in Chanderi, Ashoknagar, Madhya Pradesh to modernise the dying craft of Chanderi saree-making. It shows that by utilising design software and internet connectivity on a PC, the women behind the textile-making were able to expand their presence online, thus elevating their business from a local emporium to a digital store.

Our Take
India may have the second largest smartphone consumer base. Prime Minister Narendra Modi might be promoting for a ‘Digital India’. Or subsidised tablets priced at R1500 might have been launched in the country almost six years ago, but the Intel campaign takes you back to the time when computers were a rarity in the country.

For the first time, Intel has launched an advertising campaign in India to showcase its Ek Kadam Unnati Ki Aur initiative. “The next wave of technology adoption in India will come from lower tier cities, and reaching this audience requires a differentiated approach that strikes the ideal balance between hardware, software, solutions and training,” says Sandeep Aurora, director, marketing and market development, Intel South Asia. The campaign comprises two TVCs, both dealing with transforming lives through Intel-enabled computing devices.

On why do the TVCs feel like they belong in the 90s, Aurora says, “In the 90s, India’s economy had just opened up to international brands and the internet revolution was taking off. As multinationals targeted Indian consumers, marketing campaigns were focussed on the urban, aspirational consumer. Today, as non-urban regions aspire to come at par with cosmopolitan cities, the focus is on appealing to untapped geographies and demographics.”

One can’t help but notice that the Chanderi TVC has an uncanny similarity to the Google Chrome Tanjore commercial which too was inspired by the real story of G Rajendran, an artist from Tamil Nadu who used the web to bring the dying art of Tanjore paintings back to life and became a successful businessman in the process.

The campaign, conceptualised by McGarryBowen, a Dentsu Aegis network agency headquartered in the US, is simple and fits the bill when it comes to informative advertising. However, it fails to generate any emotions which otherwise would have helped the brand connect with its TG. One won’t be wrong to say it is a dry film, stereotypical of the IT world.

Also, the concept of this ad is not new either. Earlier too, people in rural India selling traditional  products online and a villager making it big in the cities have been portrayed an umpteen number of times by various brands in their attempt to show the real ‘India’.
But is this campaign a tad too late to join the ‘Bharat’  bandwagon? Perhaps.

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