EU orders Apple to pay up to 13 billion euros tax to Ireland

By: | Updated: August 30, 2016 3:51 PM

EU antitrust regulators ordered Apple on Tuesday to pay up to 13 billion euros ($14.5 billion) in taxes to the Irish government after ruling that a special scheme to route profits through Ireland was illegal state aid.

The massive sum, some 40 times bigger than the previous known demand by the European Commission to a company in such a case, could be reduced, the EU executive said in a statement, if other countries sought more tax themselves from the U.S. tech giant. (Reuters)The massive sum, some 40 times bigger than the previous known demand by the European Commission to a company in such a case, could be reduced, the EU executive said in a statement, if other countries sought more tax themselves from the U.S. tech giant. (Reuters)

EU antitrust regulators ordered Apple on Tuesday to pay up to 13 billion euros ($14.5 billion) in taxes to the Irish government after ruling that a special scheme to route profits through Ireland was illegal state aid.

The massive sum, some 40 times bigger than the previous known demand by the European Commission to a company in such a case, could be reduced, the EU executive said in a statement, if other countries sought more tax themselves from the US tech giant. Apple, which with Ireland, has already said it will appeal the decision, paid a tax rate on European profits of between 0.005 and 1 percent, the Commission said.

However, Ireland has profoundly disagreed with the European Commission’s ruling against its tax dealings with Apple Inc, Finance Minister Michael Noonan said on Tuesday ahead of seeking cabinet approval to appeal.

Ireland’s finance ministry said its position remained that the full amount of tax was paid and no state aid was provided. Ireland did not give favourable tax treatment to Apple and does not do deals with taxpayers, it added.

It also said the disputed tax opinions in the Apple case no longer applied and that the decision had no effect on Ireland’s 12.5 percent corporate tax rate or on any other company with operations in the country.

“I disagree profoundly with the Commission,” Noonan said in a statement. “The decision leaves me with no choice but to seek cabinet approval to appeal. This is necessary to defend the integrity of our tax system; to provide tax certainty to business; and to challenge the encroachment of EU state aid rules into the sovereign member state competence of taxation.”

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