​​​
  1. Blackberry Jarvis: A new digital watchdog

Blackberry Jarvis: A new digital watchdog

BlackBerry’s Jarvis identifies security flaws in software of connected cars.

By: | New Delhi | Published: February 15, 2018 1:34 AM
Blackberry Jarvis, Blackberry, industry, smartphone industry, healthcare BlackBerry reckons that Jarvis is applicable to other industry segments, citing healthcare, industrial automation, aerospace, and defence as examples of other fields with immediate need for this product.

This Jarvis is not Tony Stark’s home computing system from the Hollywood block-buster Iron Man movie series, that takes care of everything to do with the house, from heating and cooling systems to engine analysis of Stark’s hot rod in the garage. BlackBerry Jarvis is the Canadian device maker’s transformational software cyber security product. The Waterloo-based firm is marketing this solution to automakers, whose complex software supply chains create compelling and urgent use cases that Jarvis can help solve. BlackBerry reckons that Jarvis is applicable to other industry segments, citing healthcare, industrial automation, aerospace, and defence as examples of other fields with immediate need for this product.

Built on the company’s decades of cybersecurity expertise and proprietary technology, Jarvis is a one-of-its-kind cloud-based static binary code scanning solution that identifies vulnerabilities in software used in automobiles. Jarvis scans and delivers deep actionable insights in minutes, what would otherwise involve manually scanning that would take a numbers of experts and an impractical amount of time.

“Connected and autonomous vehicles require some of the most complex software ever developed, creating a significant challenge for automakers who must ensure the code complies with industry and manufacturer-specific standards while simultaneously battle-hardening a very large and tempting attack surface for cybercriminals,” said John Chen, executive chairman and CEO, BlackBerry.

Exacerbating the challenge for OEMs is the fact that vehicles use hundreds of software components, many of which are written by an expansive network of third party suppliers spread across several tiers. This distributed supply chain offers many advantages while also increasing opportunities for human error that can slow down production cycles and impact overall quality.

Chen continued: “Jarvis is a game-changer for OEMs because for the first time they have a complete, consistent, and near real-time view into the security posture of a vehicle’s entire code base along with the insights and deep learning needed to predict and fix vulnerabilities, ensure compliance, and remain a step ahead of bad actors.”

Proven and tested, BlackBerry has already begun trialing Jarvis with some of the world’s largest automakers, such as Jaguar Land Rover.

Get live Stock Prices from BSE and NSE and latest NAV, portfolio of Mutual Funds, calculate your tax by Income Tax Calculator, know market’s Top Gainers, Top Losers & Best Equity Funds. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

  1. No Comments.

Go to Top