To tackle Naxals in Maharashtra, Uddhav Thackeray plans to take a leaf out of Chhattisgarh’s book

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Published: January 3, 2020 12:53:38 PM

Maharashtra government is considering the introduction of a Special Public Security Act on the lines of Chhattisgarh. The law will give more powers to the police and government agencies to keep a check on the Naxal activities.

Uddhav Thackeray Uddhav Thackeray government plans tough law to check activities of Naxals.

The Uddhav Thackeray-led Maha Vikas Aghadi government in Maharashtra is planning to introduce a tough law on the lines of the Chhattisgarh Special Public Security Act to deal with the Naxal menace in the state. According to The Indian Express, the Maharashtra government is considering the introduction of a Special Public Security Act on the lines of Chhattisgarh. The law will give more powers to the police and government agencies to keep a check on the Naxal activities.

State Home Minister Eknath Shinde confirmed that the law will be on the lines of Chhattisgarh government’s Special Public Security Act. He said a decision will be taken after discussing it with the Chief Minister.

The development comes after Shinde’s visit to Gadchiroli district last month, following which he held a meeting with senior police officials earlier this week to discuss the issues raised by the officials during his visit to the Naxal-hit district.

Citing an official, the IE report said that the demand for a tough law to tackle Naxals was made three years ago by police officers. The home, law and judiciary departments have been asked to study the Chhattisgarh government’s law. The departments have been asked to take all other aspects into account and prepare a draft law.

What is Chhattisgarh Special Public Security Act, 2005

The CSPSA was passed by the Chhattisgarh Legislative Assembly in 2005. It provides powers to the police to detain a person who poses danger to peace in society and and disturb the law and order situation. The act says any person whose actions encourage the disobedience of the established law will be considered ‘unlawful’.

The law authorises the police to detain a person for committing acts, which among other things, show a “tendency to pose an obstacle to the administration of law”. The act also states any person whose actions “encourage(s) the disobedience of the established law” will be considered “unlawful”.

Six organisations were banned under this act. Binayak Sen, General Secretary, Chhattisgarh People’s Union for Civil Liberties (PUCL), and Vice-President, National PUCL was detained under this law in May 2007 allegedly for his linkages with the Communist Party of India (Maoist).

The state government invited criticism from activists, lawyers and tribals over the law. They alleged that this law could be used by the police to harass innocents and crush dissenting voices.

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