Now Delhi Police offering eye-ball grabbing history lessons through Twitter; know how

By: | Published: September 24, 2017 12:20 PM

The Delhi Police has taken up an interesting way of acquainting people about cases solved in yesteryears.

Hoax, Hoax call, Red Fort, blow up Red Fort, Hoax call to blow up Red Fort, Delhi police, terror attack, terror threat, blast threat, terror attack threat in Delhi, fake news, hoax call for Red Fort blow upInterestingly, the campaign was conceived after police sought the help of an advertising company by the name of Astral. (Reuters)

The Delhi Police has taken up an interesting way of acquainting people about cases solved in yesteryears. Delhi Police has decided to highlight mysteries solved years ago on Twitter by posting a photo, trivia or cases related to it. While the entire process of tweeting the article to it going viral takes a few hours, a three-member research team spent four months looking for relevant cases to be showcased, Indian Express reported. From skimming through its books, faded FIR copies, logbooks and complaint copies, police department has revealed some of the most interesting cases of the past. Interestingly, the campaign was conceived after police sought the help of an advertising company by the name of Astral. It was the social media team which suggested to the Delhi Police official to highlight some of the cases in order to “get a better connect with the audience”.

After a series of discussions, the senior officers gave a green signal to the campaign launched by the name ‘Kuch Khaas Hai Itihaas’. Delhi Police spokesperson Madhur Verma was taking care of the authenticity of the research work said, “The whole point was to make sure that interesting history of the Delhi Police is shared with the public.” The three-man research team that started off work from the month of May after being briefed by the Delhi headquarters. They visited the Delhi Police Museum and the library and discovered an intimidating array of books and realised they needed a guide.

Ayushi Dwivedi, the field researcher, said, adding that claims in the books were corroborated by 15 DCPs. “We had got our hands on an in-house Delhi Police journal and found some beautiful poems by inspector Rajendra Singh Kalkal. He used to be the inspector research at Delhi Police Museum and guided us with our first stories, including the first FIR registered by Delhi Police.” The team went through a tedious job initially going through “50 books and 60 magazines,” he said. Dwivedi while photographing exhibits at the museum said, ”It was difficult for us to identify the instrument. Once we managed to clear dirt from the glass and read the description during our fourth visit to the museum, we found that it was, in fact, the first wireless system used by the police and not a radio.” It was after the whole process that the image was then uploaded on Twitter.

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