Letters To the editor

By: | Published: May 12, 2016 6:13 AM

In reference to the article “Digital India and privacy” (FE, May 11), right to privacy though not specifically enshrined in the citizen’s fundamental rights, is nevertheless derived from the strength of any number of court judgements.

Right to privacy

In reference to the article “Digital India and privacy” (FE, May 11), right to privacy though not specifically enshrined in the citizen’s fundamental rights, is nevertheless derived from the strength of any number of court judgements. When this is sought to be invaded by an arm of the government for legitimate investigation, procedures and rules apply. Implicit in such permission to invade,is the proviso that the agency shall hold such information as obtained, in the strictest of confidence and personal accountability .In the case of Radia tape leaks,there was grave indiscretion. The door then opens to an Orwellian nightmare, only to severely damage our pretensions to democratic life. FBI’s asking Apple to assist entering into encrypted data of users has laid foundation to another debate. Cyber crimes brought on the early inklings for a need to pay attention to this aspect. The government is responsible for an umbrella of concerns that includes national security, even as millions of legitimate users need personal and business privacy. It is good that Apple has stood up the way it has and the FBI is equally pressing. This must lead to the determination of a framework within which all must operate. That would repose immense responsibilities, firstly on the government and then on the likes of the FBI, to demonstrate and retain credibility.

R Narayanan

Ghaziabad

SC to the rescue

This refers to the well timed edit “Keeping it NEET” (FE, May 11). The decision of the Supreme Court to pronounce that the National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET) should be the only gateway to medical education in the country could not have come at a better time. It will now obviate the need to conduct 35 entrance examinations for admissions at 412 medical colleges in the country which had always left a wide scope for corrupt systems in public-funded institutes to come up. One highly appreciates the editorial concerns that such a multiple entrance test regime had also led to a thriving capitation fee market in private colleges where monied candidates, irrespective of merit, were able to capture seats. NEET would ensure a threshold quality for future medical practitioners as regards their basic competencies and skills to practice across the country. Needless to say that no nation can afford to ‘compromise’ with the best laid standards in respect of the medical education as the ‘good health for all’ must be one of its prime concern.

SK Gupta

Delhi

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