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  1. Brahmean: Notes of change include pollution, corruption, economy

Brahmean: Notes of change include pollution, corruption, economy

The New Delhi-based musicians, who are looking to break into the music scene this year, already have a list of songs on their YouTube channel.

Published: February 18, 2018 3:46 AM
brahmean, hip hop, brahmean youtube, brahmean band, indian hip hop band Brahmean, a two-member music band, was formed in 2017 when two young men grew tired of the toxic music trending in the country.

Brahmean, a two-member music band, was formed in 2017 when two young men grew tired of the toxic music trending in the country. “I would turn on the TV or radio and all I would hear were songs with the words ladki, daaru and party. No one was singing about anything original or worthwhile,” says 22-year-old Harshit Joshi, who writes lyrics and composes music for Brahmean. Joshi, who performs trap and hip hop, connected last year with 22-year-old DJ Mayank Sharma, the other half of Brahmean, when he came across tracks composed and posted by Sharma on Instagram. They met and decided to collaborate.  The New Delhi-based musicians, who are looking to break into the music scene this year, already have a list of songs on their YouTube channel. Their only speed-breaker, they say, is homogenised content, which is being regurgitated and repackaged for mass consumption. “Only if it was easy getting people’s mind off Bollywood,” says Joshi, who quit his advertising job in Gurugram in October 2017 to start Brahmean.

But what are the notes they are trying to hit to bring about change? “We’re talking about the pollution in Delhi, corruption that is eating away our economy, the plight of soldiers on the border… things that need to be spoken about,” says Sharma, who dropped out of college at Indraprastha University in 2015. The duo—who use a storytelling format with a beginning, a middle and a climax—say each of their songs has a twist at the end to present something unexpected to listeners.

“We want to set an example. People should realise that there is another way to sustain yourself… zaruri nahi ki Vrindavan mein rehna hai to radhe-radhe kehna hai,” says Joshi. The main idea behind their work, they say, is to encourage other artistes to draw away from the complacent “commercial” formula and make meaningful music. Joshi, who is currently pursuing a course on playing the keys from the Delhi School of Music, says they aren’t afraid to dive head-first into the business of making issue-based music. “Quitting isn’t an option. We will make this work,” he says.

By: Ananaya Banerjee

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