JEE advanced cutoff 2018: As IIT issues extended merit list after HRD nudge, a look at how it admits students

By: | Published: June 15, 2018 11:54 AM

IIT JEE advanced cutoff 2018: In an unprecedented move, the Joint Admission Board (JAB) of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) on Thursday issued an extended merit list after the HRD Ministry asked them to do so.

IIT CUT OFF

IIT JEE advanced cutoff 2018: In an unprecedented move, the Joint Admission Board (JAB) of the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) on Thursday issued an extended merit list after the HRD Ministry asked them to do so. The revised merit list has as many as 31,980 candidates as having qualified for the JEE-Advanced. The first list, which was released on June 10, had 18,138 candidates. The extended merit list was issued following a meeting of the JAB yesterday. “Choice filling on JoSAA (Joint Seat Allocation Authority) would be started on 15th June as scheduled earlier. Students in the extended merit list can start filling up their options along with others,” an official statement said.

In a first, the HRD Ministry on Thursday issued directions to the IITs to release a supplementary merit list for admissions this year. “Responding to requests from students and IIT community to proactively ensure that all reservation seats are duly filled, I have directed @IIT Kanpur conducting JEE advanced to make available candidates, strictly as per merit, twice the number of seats in each category,” Union HRD Minister Prakash Javadekar tweeted.

This is the first time that the cut-off list has been revised after the declaration of results. The number of candidates who qualified the exam has always been at least twice the number of seats on offer. This year, however, the 18,138 students against the total of 11,279 seats on the merit list are only 1.6 times the total seats, making it the smallest number of qualified candidates since 2012.

While thousands of aspirants want to achieve their dream of pursuing higher education in the IITs, only a handful can as the process is quite stringent. Take a look at the process as explained by Professor Dheeraj Sanghi, who teaches computer science at IIT Kanpur, to The Indian Express. Notably, IIT Kanpur was the organising institute for JEE-Advanced this year,

Eligibility and cutoff

Eligibility criteria for IITs include a certain minimum performance in Class XII (75% marks, or 80th percentile), the year in which the candidate passed Class XII, age (25 years for General/OBC-NCL, 30 years for SC/ST), performance above a certain threshold in JEE Main (roughly top 1 lakh ranks for General, and corresponding numbers for other categories), marks in each subject in JEE Advanced (10% for General, 9% for OBC-NCL, 5% for SC/ST/PwD), and marks scored in all three subjects combined (35% for General, 31.5% for OBC-NCL, 17.5% for SC/ST/PwD).

All candidates, who meet all eligibility criteria, are given a rank in the order of total scores in JEE Advanced. General candidates are given a Common Rank. Category students are given a Category Rank, and also a Common Rank if they meet the eligibility criteria meant for general students. The cutoff for admission is in terms of this rank.

How viable is this extended merit list

“Legally speaking, lowering the eligibility after the exam is questionable. It has happened in the past that private engineering colleges have not received enough applications and they have requested lowering of eligibility conditions to fill those seats, which has been refused. If there aren’t enough eligible candidates, you leave the seats unfilled. However, the counter-argument is that the eligibility condition was already compromised each year by IITs by giving lots of free marks and, in one year, by actually lowering the marks required to be eligible. And no one has ever challenged filling up of seats by compromising announced conditions. And, indeed, it is obvious that no one is hurt if IITs lower their eligibility conditions and fill up the seats. And hence it is unlikely that anyone will question this in a court of law this year either,” Sanghi said.

The situation this year

Sanghi said that in previous years, question papers more than often carried a few errors. In such cases, marks for such erroneous questions had to be given to all candidates. “But this year, there was no such error, and maybe the questions were slightly more difficult as well. Hence, an insufficient number of students have scored more than 35%,” Sanghi cited.

In most years, there have been some errors in the question paper, which has necessitated that marks for such questions be given to all candidates. Such errors have ensured that the number of students above the total marks requirement of 35% remained high. But this year, there was no such error, and maybe the questions were slightly more difficult as well. Hence, an insufficient number of students have scored more than 35%. This had happened in 2015 also. And at that time, IITs had decided to lower the eligibility condition after the results were tabulated but not announced to the public.

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