IIT Guwahati researchers design affordable ‘Radiative Cooler’ coating material

This ‘Radiative Cooler’ coating material is an ‘electricity-free’ cooling system which can be applied on the rooftops and functions both during day and night time to provide an alternate to the conventional air-conditioners.

Most passive radiative coolers operate only at night and for daytime operation, these need to reflect solar radiation.
Most passive radiative coolers operate only at night and for daytime operation, these need to reflect solar radiation.

Researchers at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Guwahati researchers have designed an affordable and efficient ‘passive’ radiative cooling system that does not require electricity to operate. Passive radiative cooling systems operate by emitting the heat absorbed from the surrounding in the form of infrared radiations that can pass through the atmosphere before getting dumped into the cold outer space.

Ashish Kumar Chowdhary, research scholar, IIT Guwahati under the supervision of professor Debabrata Sikdar, assistant professor, Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, IIT Guwahati, along with his research team has designed and modelled this passive radiative cooler.

This ‘Radiative Cooler’ coating material is an ‘electricity-free’ cooling system. It can be applied on the rooftops and functions both during day and night time to provide an alternate to the conventional air-conditioners.

“These radiative coolers requiring no external energy sources for their operation could be one of the best alternatives to replace the conventional air conditioning systems used to cool buildings and automobiles in countries experiencing hot weather, such as India. Unlike traditional cooling technologies that dump the waste heat into the surroundings, radiative cooling is a unique process that cools an object on the earth by sending excessive heat directly into the extremely cold Universe,”

Most passive radiative coolers operate only at night. For daytime operation, these coolers need to reflect entire solar radiation as well. Till now, these cooling systems are not able to provide sufficient cooling at daytime.

“For a radiative cooler to work during daytime, the material should reflect the solar and atmospheric radiations falling on it. Since the materials used in conventional coolers absorb more solar radiations and emit less during the day, those do not work during daytime. While daytime cooling can be achieved using polymer-based passive radiative coolers, oxidation degrades the polymers resulting in a limited lifespan,” Chowdhary said.

Read also: Bengal to continue online admission for undergrad, postgrad courses

Get live Share Market updates and latest India News and business news on Financial Express. Download Financial Express App for latest business news.

Most Read In Education 2
Photos