Delhi University admission 2018: Worried about high DU cut-offs? Here is a good news you won’t like to miss

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New Delhi | Published: January 16, 2018 1:12 PM

Delhi University admission 2018: Its that time of the year again when class 12th students are busy preparing for their upcoming board examinations.

Delhi University, Delhi University admission, Delhi University admission 2018, DU, DU admissions, DU cut-offs, du.ac.in, board examinations, unrealistic cut-offs, DU admission panel, DU admissions committee, DU aspirants, DU registration process, education newsDelhi University admission 2018: The big news for all DU aspirants this year is regarding the ‘unrealistic’ cut-offs. (Photo: du.ac.in)

Delhi University admission 2018: Its that time of the year again when class 12th students are busy preparing for their upcoming board examinations. Along with prepping up for the exams, students at this time also give a lot of thought about what they want to do after 12th and what college they want to study from. Delhi University stands on the top of the list for many students and the registration process for admission to DU is likely to start in April after the board exams. The big news for all DU aspirants this year is that the ‘unrealistic’ cut-offs that crush dreams of many students every year may finally be reduced. You read that right. The DU admission panel is mulling over the “unrealistic cut-offs” and is planning to meet different boards in the country regarding the same.

Head of a 47-member DU admissions committee, Maharaj K Pandit while talking about the cutoffs said, “It has been observed that till three or four cut-off lists are out, seats are not filled in some colleges mainly due to unrealistic cut-offs. We are thinking to hold orientation programmes to help principals understand this.” According to reports, the University is planning to get in touch with different boards and get a disclaimer from them that they will not indulge in moderation and inflate marks. A meeting will be held by DU with principals of the 63 colleges where the panel will present them the data of the past few years, so they can give inputs on how cut-offs ought to be.

M K Pandit said, “For the first few lists, colleges keep very high cut-offs and end up not seeing admission. This results in an elongated admission process.” Further, the panel has decided to set up a committee to look into the viability of conducting online counselling so that the seats are automatically allocated online without any dependence on the principals of around 63 DU colleges. “The committee will suggest ways to allocate seats to students through a centralised system without the dependence of principals in order to save time,” Pandit said. The panel also set up two more committees to explore the possibility of holding online admission tests for undergraduate courses and to decide merit-based admissions in postgraduate courses.

Meanwhile, the University panel is also thinking about reducing the duration of the admission process that normally takes. While the registration for admission to the Delhi University’s 2018-19 academic session is expected to begin in April, with the varsity mulling to cut short the duration of its admission process this time. Pandit while talking about the same said that the panel was planning to take a slew of measures to curtail the time taken during the admission process. The admission at DU is normally extended from 4 to 5 months.

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