Operation Samudra Setu: Next Phase starts today, Indians start returning from the Maldives

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Updated: Jun 21, 2020 2:55 PM

According to the Indian Navy, the INS Airavat reached Male on June 20, and the process of Immigration/ check-in activities have already commenced at the Velana Airport for embarking onboard the ship for the return journey.

Operation Samudra Setu, indian navy, INS Airavat, Velana Airport,immigration, COVID-19, INS Jalashwa, INS Magar, INS Shardul, defence news, latest news on Operation Samudra SetuThe Indian Navy launched Operation ‘Samudra Setu’ as part of the national effort to repatriate Indian citizens from overseas. (Photo source: Indian Navy)

Indian Navy sends out INS Airavat to repatriate around 250 stranded Indians from Malè, to Tuticorin, under Operation Samudra Setu. According to the Indian Navy, the INS Airavat reached Male on June 20, and the process of Immigration/ check-in activities have already commenced at the Velana Airport for embarking onboard the ship for the return journey.

More about Operation Samudra Setu

This operation was launched on May 7, as part of national effort to repatriate Indian citizens from overseas and has been proactively instituting measures to ensure preparedness to face the challenges posed by the global pandemic of COVID-19. The Indian Navy launched Operation ‘Samudra Setu’ as part of the national effort to repatriate Indian citizens from overseas.

(Photo source: Indian Navy)

So far the Indian Navy ships have repatriated Indian citizens from the neighbouring countries including Maldives, Sri Lanka and Iran. And from these countries till date, around 3107 citizens have come back on Indian Navy Ships — INS Jalashwa – 698, 588, 686, 700, INS Magar – 202 & INS Shardul 233.

These included pregnant ladies, children and elderly.

According to the Indian Navy, on May 8 INS Jalashwa, left for Male and with 698 passengers reached Kochi on May 10. The port in Kochi received 202 more passengers who arrived onboard INS Magar which left for Male on May 10 and returned two days later.

(Photo source: Indian Navy)

On May 15, INS Jalashwa embarked 588 personnel & arrived in Kochi on May 17.

INS Jalashwa left for Colombo, Sri Lanka on June 1, and came back with 686 Indian nationals including women & children and headed to Tuticorin, Tamil Nadu the next day. The ship turned around to get back 700 stranded citizens from Male on June 5 and returned to Tuticorin.

More about INS Jalashwa

This ship can generate 212 tons of freshwater a day and has extensive medical facilities, because of which it makes it ideally suited to undertake HADR missions. It is loaded with relief and COVID protection material as well as medical and administrative support staff to undertake the evacuation.

As reported earlier this month, INS Shardul embarked 233 Indian Bandar Abbas Iran, on June 8, and entered Porbandar, Gujarat on June 11.

Special provisions have been made for the evacuation operation onboard all these ships and are fully equipped with medical supplies, doctors, hygienists and nutritionists. Also, on INS Shardul all the innovative products made by the Indian Navy to stop the spreading of the global pandemic are available. All these have been designed developed in-house by the Indian Navy and are all made in India.

All those who are boarding these ships are all COVID-19 negative cases, however, in case there is any contingency, arrangements have been made for isolating a passenger.

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