Budget 2018: Fix farmers woes by going the Telangana way; here’s how

By: | Published: January 29, 2018 6:06 AM

Budget 2018: Farm distress is likely to be one of the major focal points of the Union Budget 2018-19, as the growth in agri-GDP as well as farmers’ (real) incomes has fallen to around 2% per annum during the first four years of the Modi government.

budget 2018 budget date budget 2018 india India budget Union budget 2018 budget 2018 expectations budget expectation for farmers farmers budget expectations what farmers want from budgetBudget 2018: This is much below targets and expectations of doubling farmers’ incomes by 2022. (Reuters)

Budget 2018: Farm distress is likely to be one of the major focal points of the Union Budget 2018-19, as the growth in agri-GDP as well as farmers’ (real) incomes has fallen to around 2% per annum during the first four years of the Modi government. This is much below targets and expectations of doubling farmers’ incomes by 2022. With Assembly elections in 10 states due by May 2019, states are also making diverse attempts to woo farmers. While some have announced loan waivers, others are trying to fix farmers’ woes emanating from tumbling farm prices. Here we focus on two pilots to see if they can be scaled up at an all-India level. First is Bhavantar Bhugtan Yojana (BBY), essentially a price deficiency payment (PDP) scheme, undertaken by the government of Madhya Pradesh (GoMP). The BBY is meant for eight notified kharif crops (soybean, maize, urad, tur, moong, groundnut, til and ramtil). Haryana has announced an almost similar scheme for four vegetables—potatoes, onions, tomatoes and cauliflower. Second pilot scheme is what Telangana has announced, ie, giving Rs 4,000 per acre per season to all farmers as investment support for their working capital needs.

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Budget 2018: Under the BBY of GoMP, farmers have to first register on a portal. Their sown area is to be verified by govt officials. They are then asked to bring their produce to mandis during the specified period as determined by the state government. Based on average productivity of a crop in the district and area cultivated by the farmer, the quantity of each produce that is eligible for deficiency payment is also determined by the GoMP. Farmers would receive the difference between average sale price (ASP) and MSP directly into their bank accounts. The scheme seems interesting, as it provides an alternative to physical procurement of commodities at MSP. The ASP is calculated as simple average of the weighted modal prices of the relevant crops in agricultural produce market committee of the GoMP and two adjoining states. Price information is drawn from AGMARKNET portal.

Budget 2018: For kharif 2017-18, so far, the data for five crops (soybean, maize, groundnut, urad and moong) for price deficiency payment has been finalised. The market prices of til and ramtil are higher than the MSP and, therefore, they do not quality for PDP. Tur season will start from February, 2018. The accompanying graph shows the key results of the BBY for October-December, 2017, period. It is interesting to note that only 32% of urad production in MP got the benefit of the BBY, despite the fact that the ASP of urad was 42% below its MSP. In other words, 68% of urad production was sold at prices way below MSP without any compensation under the BBY. In case of soybean, which is MP’s prime kharif crop, the percentage of production benefiting from this scheme is even lower, only 18.5%, despite its ASP being 12% below the MSP. And for maize, groundnut and moong, the coverage is even poorer (see graph). This speaks of poor inclusiveness of the BBY.

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Budget 2018: Under the Telangana model, there is no need for each farmer to register the area and crop cultivated by him. The farmer is free to grow a crop of his choice and he is free to sell it any time in any mandi of his choice. This model is crop-neutral, more equitable, more transparent, and empowers farmers with freedom to choose. Incidentally, this is what China has also followed at the national level, which gives “aggregate input subsidy support” on per acre basis. We feel this is worth emulating, as it does not distort markets. Will the Union Budget make such a bold move to redress farmers’ woes? Stay tuned to the Budget day!

Co-authored by Siraj Hussain

(Gulati is Infosys chair professor for agriculture, Hussain is former secretary of agriculture, GoI, and currently visiting senior fellow at ICRIER)

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