India seeks alliance with US for clean coal technologies

Mumbai, Nov 16 | Updated: Nov 17 2005, 05:30am hrs
After its recent pact with the US on civil nuclear energy, India proposes to enter into an alliance with the US for the adoption of clean coal technologies in the country.

India, which is expected to face a coal shortfall of 87 million tonne by 2011-12, proposes to introduce the technologies to improve efficiency and curb pollution.

A high-level delegation led by Pradeep Kumar, additional secretary, ministry of coal and mines, has left for the US on Wednesday to participate in the government to government dialogue scheduled to take place early next week.

The delegation will also take part in the two-day workshop on clean technologies and use of coal rejects in the power generation.

The ministry sources told FE, The delegation has already left this morning for the US. It will assess various opportunities to seek alliance with the US department of energy for adoption of clean coal technologies in India. It is not possible this time the outcome of the proposed meetings.

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India, which is expected to face a coal shortfall of 87 million tonne by 2011-12, proposes to introduce the technologies to improve efficiency and curb pollution
The team will take part in the workshop on clean technologies and use of coal rejects in power generation
US has already introduced an initiative to design, build and operate the first coal-fired, emissions-free power plant
The sources recalled the US Congress had recently passed the first comprehensive energy legislation in over a decade.

The Bill aims to strengthen USAs electrical infrastructure, reduce its dependence on foreign oil, increase conservation and expand the use of clean renewable energy.

According to the sources, US has already introduced FutureGen, a $1-billion public-private initiative to design, build and operate the first coal-fired, emissions-free power plant.

Rather than burning coal as todays conventional plants do, the approximately 275-megawatt FutureGen plant turns coal into a gas and employ new technology to remove virtually all of the resultant air pollutants - sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and mercury.

Carbon capture and storage technologies will be used to separate carbon dioxide from other gases.

Once isolated, the carbon dioxide will be sequestered in underground formations such as those currently being field tested in New Mexico and Canada.