Heart drug may treat paralysing disease: study

Written by PTI | Washington | Updated: Oct 27 2014, 22:14pm hrs
HeartDigoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (Reuters)
A drug used in the treatment of heart failure may be able to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - a progressive paralysing disease, according to a new study.

Digoxin, a medication used in the treatment of heart failure, may be adaptable for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis have found.

ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, destroys the nerve cells that control muscles. This leads to loss of mobility, difficulty breathing and swallowing and eventually death. Riluzole, the sole medication approved to treat the disease, has only marginal benefits in patients.

In a new study conducted in cell cultures and in mice, scientists showed that when they reduced the activity of an enzyme or limited cells' ability to make copies of the enzyme, the disease's destruction of nerve cells stopped. The enzyme maintains the proper balance of sodium and potassium in cells.

"We blocked the enzyme with digoxin. This had a very strong effect, preventing the death of nerve cells that are normally killed in a cell culture model of ALS," said senior author Azad Bonni.

The results stemmed from Bonni's studies of brain cells' stress responses in a mouse model of ALS. The mice have a mutated version of a gene that causes an inherited form of the disease and develop many of the same symptoms seen in humans with ALS, including paralysis and death.

Efforts to monitor the activity of a stress response protein in the mice unexpectedly led the scientists to another protein: sodium-potassium ATPase.

This enzyme ejects charged sodium particles from cells and takes in charged potassium particles, allowing cells to maintain an electrical charge across their outer membranes.

Maintenance of this charge is essential for the normal function of cells. The particular sodium-potassium ATPase highlighted by Bonni's studies is found in nervous system cells called astrocytes. In the ALS mice, levels of the enzyme are higher than normal in astrocytes.

Bonni's group found that the increase in sodium-potassium ATPase led the astrocytes to release harmful factors called inflammatory cytokines, which may kill motor neurons.

Recent studies have suggested that astrocytes may be crucial contributors to neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS, and Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases.

"Even though the neurons are normal, there's something going on in the astrocytes that is harming the neurons," said Bonni.

The findings appear in the journal Nature Neuroscience.