1. Uber loses London licence and the reason may surprise riders

Uber loses London licence and the reason may surprise riders

Uber has been stripped of its licence to operate in London. Here's why.

By: | Updated: September 22, 2017 5:48 PM
In a massive blow to Uber, London’s transport regulator has rejected its application to renew the licence to operate. (Photo: Reuters)

Uber has been stripped of its licence to operate in London after months of criticism from unions, lawmakers, and drivers. The taxi-hailing service has recently been ailing from tumultuous times recently, where it has seen itself embroiled in controversies, scandals, and more. The problems became so huge that founder and former CEO Travis Kalanick had to resign from his post. Now, in yet another massive blow to Uber, London’s transport regulator has rejected its application to renew the licence to operate. In a statement, today Transport for London (TfL) noted that the conclusion has been that Uber is ‘not fit and proper to hold a private hire operator licence’. Uber’s licence to operate in London ends on September 30.

Uber has been forced to go out from many nations such as Denmark and Hungary. It has also faced regulatory battles in several states in the US and other countries around the world. TfL, in its report, said that Uber’s “approach and conduct demonstrate a lack of corporate responsibility in relation to a number of issues which have potential public safety and security implications.” The regulator has informed that the Private Hire Vehicles (London) Act 1998 has a provision that an appeal can be filed against a licensing decision within 21 days of its issuance. It also confirmed that the taxi service can continue to operate until the time any appeal processes get exhausted.

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Transport for London’s issues with Uber:
1. Its approach to reporting serious criminal offences.
2. Its approach to how medical certificates are obtained.
3. Its approach to how Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) checks are obtained.
4. Its approach to explaining the use of Greyball in London – software that could be used to block regulatory bodies from gaining full access to the app and 5. prevent officials from undertaking regulatory or law enforcement duties.


 

Uber’s response: Tom Elvidge, general manager of Uber in London: “3.5 million Londoners who use our app, and more than 40,000 licensed drivers who rely on Uber to make a living, will be astounded by this decision. By wanting to ban our app from the capital Transport for London and the Mayor have caved in to a small number of people who want to restrict consumer choice. If this decision stands, it will put more than 40,000 licensed drivers out of work and deprive Londoners of a convenient and affordable form of transport.”

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