1. US Elections 2016: Donald Trump leads by 216 electoral college votes, swing states, including Ohio and Florida, in favour of Donald Trump

US Elections 2016: Donald Trump leads by 216 electoral college votes, swing states, including Ohio and Florida, in favour of Donald Trump

US Elections 2016: According to the latest update by CNN, Donald Trump has won the key battleground state Ohio and has achieved a lead on Hillary Clinton by 167 electoral college votes to 109.

By: | Updated: November 9, 2016 10:26 AM
The race is still too close to call in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, states that could be vital to deciding which contender wins the presidency. The race is still too close to call in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, states that could be vital to deciding which contender wins the presidency.

The US election results are just going crazy with every passing minute. According to the latest update by CNN, Donald Trump has won the key battleground state Ohio. According to the latest projections, Trump has won Ohio after a close and nail biting battle with his arch rival Clinton. He has also won in Florida, says a news update from AP. But with Hillary Clinton winning in California, she has achieved a lead on Donald Trump by 190 electoral college votes to 171.

The race is still too close to call in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, states that could be vital to deciding which contender wins the presidency. According to US networks, Hillary Clinton has won in Virginia. Both candidates scored victories in states where they were expected to win. Trump captured conservative states in the South and Midwest, while Clinton swept several states on the East Coast and Illinois in the Midwest.

Those victories were long predicted and not especially significant in the national race, which is likely to turn on a half-dozen toss-up states that will be crucial in the state-by-state fight for 270 Electoral College votes needed to win. Clinton had more options to reach 270, with Trump needing a virtual sweep of about six toss-up states to win.

In a presidential campaign that focused more on the character of the candidates than on policy, Clinton, 69, a former US secretary of state, and Trump, 70, a New York businessman, accused each other of being fundamentally unfit to lead the country. Trump again raised the possibility on Tuesday of not accepting the election’s outcome, saying he had seen reports of voting irregularities. He gave few details and Reuters could not immediately verify the existence of such problems. In North Carolina, the state elections board extended voting hours in eight Durham County locations after technical errors led to long waits.

(With inputs from Reuters)

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