1. Climate change: Negotiators release new, shorter draft of accord, eye landmark deal

Climate change: Negotiators release new, shorter draft of accord, eye landmark deal

Raising hopes of a landmark climate deal, negotiators today unveiled a new shorter draft incorporating major progress as well as the differences, two days ahead of the deadline for the UN accord to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

By: | Published: December 9, 2015 9:45 PM

Raising hopes of a landmark climate deal, negotiators today unveiled a new shorter draft incorporating major progress as well as the differences, two days ahead of the deadline for the UN accord to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

The first draft of the Paris Outcome, prepared after two days of high-level ministerial deliberations, was released by French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, which will be discussed by 196 nations further to reach a final agreement to tackle the challenge of climate change.

The draft negotiating text, which is “shorter” from the previous version is now of 29 pages and was circulated to all the negotiating countries.

Elaborating on the draft text, Fabius, who is the chair of the current round of climate negotiations, said the aim of the text is to enable nations to have an overall view of the progress that has been made so far.

“It (draft text) is shorter than the previous version of 48 pages. It is 29 pages long now. There has been three quarter reduction in points that were there in the bracket,” he said.

“The aim of the text is to enable us (nations) to have an overall view of the progress made,” he said.

He said the document revealed “emerging compromises” on the way to the historic agreement to rein in heat-trapping greenhouse gas emissions that warm the planet.

The French foreign minister pointed out that the document revealed some compromises by the nations to achieve an ambitious and comprehensive agreement.

Fabius, however, clarified that the text which was circulated today is not the final version of the agreement.

He said the issues on differentiation, financing and the level of agreement were yet to be sorted out and he has sought clearer actions from the nations.

“On several topics we are almost at the end of our efforts thanks to the commitment of the parties,” Fabius told the conference.

“It is better,” he said, though there are “still too many” undecided sections.

He also appealed to the negotiating countries to “scale” up their discussions as there was a need to find a “point of equilibrium”.

“We have made progress but still a lot of work needs to be done,” he said.

Countries will now go through the points of the text and meet again a few hours later to deliberate on it.

“A meeting has been convened later tonight, the minister said.

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