1. Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize for Literature: Here are 5 of his greatest hits

Bob Dylan wins Nobel Prize for Literature: Here are 5 of his greatest hits

Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize in Literature "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition".

By: | Updated: October 13, 2016 6:20 PM
Jokerman was a song in the Infidels album, released in 1983 and is often said to be Bob Dylan's return from being heavily influenced by 'born-again' Christianity. (Reuters) Jokerman was a song in the Infidels album, released in 1983 and is often said to be Bob Dylan’s return from being heavily influenced by ‘born-again’ Christianity. (Reuters)

Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”. Dylan was awarded 8 million Swedish crowns, approximately $ 927,740 as the prize. Literature was 2016’s last Nobel prize to have been awarded. Dylan has been a very important part of the pop culture all around the world since the early 1960s. A lot of his legendary works have been songs based on social unrest. Although, when asked if he was the voice of the generation, he politely refused.

The 75-year old Dylan has been a recipient of many prestigious awards, including one Academy Award in 2001 in the best original song category, for the song, “Things have changed” for the movie, Wonder Boys. Dylan has also received multiple Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe. He has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and Songwriters Hall of Fame. In May 2000, Dylan received the Polar Music Prize from Sweden’s King Carl XV.

The following are the best of all his hits(opinions are subjective to change):

1. Blowin’ in the wind

“How many roads must a man walk down, Before you call him a man ?
How many seas must a white dove sail, Before she sleeps in the sand ?
Yes, how many times must the cannon balls fly, Before they’re forever banned ?”

You can feel these lines, surging through you. “Blowin’ in the Wind” is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 and released as a single and on his album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan in 1963. Although it has been described as a protest song, it poses a series of fundamental questions about peace, war and freedom.

2. Forever Young

Originally written as a lullaby for his son Jesse, this 1973 release, speaks of a father’s wish of blessing his son with an eternal youth. It opens with the lines, “May God bless and keep you always / May your wishes all come true”, echoing the Old Testament’s Book of Numbers, which has lines that begin: “May the Lord bless you and guard you / May the Lord make His face shed light upon you.”

3. The Times are a-changing

“Come gather ’round people Wherever you roam
And admit that the waters Around you have grown
And accept it that soon You’ll be drenched to the bone
If your time to you Is worth savin’
Then you better start swimmin’ Or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times they are a-changin”

This was a song written by Bob Dylan and released as the title track of his 1964 album of the same name. Dylan wrote the song as an attempt to begin an anthem of change for the time. It has later been performed my many artists, including the likes of Bruce Springsteen. It was ranked 59 on Rolling Stone’s 2004 list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.

4. Jokerman

Jokerman was a song in the Infidels album, released in 1983 and is often said to be Dylan’s return from being heavily influenced by ‘born-again’ Christianity. The Jokerman uses imagery from Biblical references. The lyrics talk about the populists, who are overly concerned with the superficial (“Michelangelo indeed could’ve carved out your features”) and more about action than thinking through the complexities (“fools rush in where angels fear to tread”). A number of critics have called Jokerman a sly political protest, addressed to an antichrist-like figure, a “manipulator of crowds … a dream twister.”

5. All along the Watchtower

“There must be some way out of here,” said the joker to the thief
There’s too much confusion, I can’t get no relief
Businessmen, they drink my wine, plowmen dig my earth
None of them along the line know what any of it is worth”

“All Along the Watchtower” is a song that initially appeared on his 1967 album John Wesley Harding, and has been included on most of Dylan’s subsequent greatest hits compilations. Since the late 1970s, he has performed it in concert more than any of his other songs. It has been reworked and later performed by the Legendary Jimmy Hendrix.

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