1. “Barking mad” Donald Trump looms over Australian election campaign

“Barking mad” Donald Trump looms over Australian election campaign

Donald Trump cast his highly coiffed shadow over the Australian election on Friday when Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull rebuked his challenger for calling the U.S. Republican party's presumptive presidential nominee "barking mad".

By: | Sydney | Published: May 27, 2016 3:20 PM
The United States is Australia's third-biggest trading partner in terms of two-way trade, behind China and Japan, but is easily its most important diplomatic and security ally.(Reuters) The United States is Australia’s third-biggest trading partner in terms of two-way trade, behind China and Japan, but is easily its most important diplomatic and security ally.(Reuters)

Donald Trump cast his highly coiffed shadow over the Australian election on Friday when Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull rebuked his challenger for calling the U.S. Republican party’s presumptive presidential nominee “barking mad”.

Australian Opposition leader Bill Shorten called Trump’s success in securing enough delegates to clinch the Republican party’s presidential nomination the “ultimate victory of celebrity politics”.

“I think Donald Trump’s views are just barking mad on some issues,” Shorten told Hot 100, a radio station in the tropical northern city of Darwin.
“Some people in America feel that politics doesn’t speak to their lives and Trump is the ultimate protest vote,” he said.

Shorten’s centre-left Labor Party is gaining ground on Turnbull’s conservative coalition government ahead of July 2 elections. His comments were quickly seized upon by Turnbull, who declared the U.S.-Australian relationship as being of “vital importance in every respect”.

“You can imagine how Australians would feel if an American president were to describe one of our prime ministerial aspirants as barking mad,” Turnbull said. “You can imagine the ill will and resentment that would create in Australia.”

The United States is Australia’s third-biggest trading partner in terms of two-way trade, behind China and Japan, but is easily its most important diplomatic and security ally.

On Thursday, U.S. President Barack Obama accused Trump of making cavalier comments for provocative effect.

Obama said at a Group of Seven summit in Japan that the billionaire real estate mogul and former reality TV star had “rattled” foreign leaders.

Trump responded by saying: “When you rattle someone, that’s good. If they’re rattled in a friendly way, that’s a good thing … not a bad thing

  1. Hoa Truong
    May 27, 2016 at 11:40 am
    Likely before Julie Bishop (Foreign minister) and Christopher Pyne (a senior minister) of Liberals slammed Donald Trump, now Labor opposition leader Bill Shorten attacks Donald Trump. The politician has to learn a French saying:" turning the tongue seven times before speaking", actually a US hopeful president as Donald Trump has won enough 1,237 delegates. In London a first Muslim Mayor who slams Trump, but if after November 8-2016, Trump elected...all have to respect the US president, actually president Donald Trump who will work alongside with U.k government, not with a Muslim London Mayor (he is a big mouth's rant). In the Australian, some politicians have not approved themselves as the national figures, not grew up yet, so they reacted like a kid.Hoa Minh Truong.(Author of 5 books)
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