South Korea ferry disaster: Top photos

Wed Apr 23 2014, 15:27 hrs
Buddhist believers taking part in volunteer activity helping family members of missing passengers of capsized passenger ship Sewol, which sank last Wednesday, pray for the victims and missing passengers below messages dedicated for the passengers, outside makeshift accommodation at a gymnasium in the port city of Jindo. Reuters photo
Buddhist believers taking part in volunteer activity helping family members of missing passengers of capsized passenger ship Sewol, which sank last Wednesday, pray for the victims and missing passengers below messages dedicated for the passengers, outside makeshift accommodation at a gymnasium in the port city of Jindo. Reuters photo
Messages wishing for the safe return of missing passengers onboard South Korean ferry Sewol, which capsized off Jindo, are seen at Incheon Port Passenger Terminal. Chonghaejin Marine Co. Ltd, the company that owned the South Korean ferry Sewol which sank last week, killing possibly hundreds of people, sprang out of a shipping to cosmetics empire founded by a businessman who was jailed for fraud and then went bankrupt. Reuters photo
Messages wishing for the safe return of missing passengers onboard South Korean ferry Sewol, which capsized off Jindo, are seen at Incheon Port Passenger Terminal. Chonghaejin Marine Co. Ltd, the company that owned the South Korean ferry Sewol which sank last week, killing possibly hundreds of people, sprang out of a shipping to cosmetics empire founded by a businessman who was jailed for fraud and then went bankrupt. Reuters photo
Divers operate at the site where the capsized passenger ship 5. Sewol sank in the sea off Jindo, during the search and rescue operation in the sea off Jindo. South Korean divers swam though dark, cold waters into a sunken ferry on Wednesday, feeling for children's bodies with their hands in a maze of cabins, corridors and upturned decks as they searched for hundreds of missing.The divers, with oxygen and communications lines trailing, can only see a few inches in front of them in the wreckage of the ship that started sinking a week ago after a sharp turn. Reuters photo
Divers operate at the site where the capsized passenger ship 5. Sewol sank in the sea off Jindo, during the search and rescue operation in the sea off Jindo. South Korean divers swam though dark, cold waters into a sunken ferry on Wednesday, feeling for children's bodies with their hands in a maze of cabins, corridors and upturned decks as they searched for hundreds of missing.The divers, with oxygen and communications lines trailing, can only see a few inches in front of them in the wreckage of the ship that started sinking a week ago after a sharp turn. Reuters photo
Divers look for people believed to have been trapped in the sunken ferry Sewol near buoys which were installed to mark the vessel in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea. One by one, coast guard officers carried the newly arrived bodies covered in white sheets from a boat to a tent on the dock of this island, the first step in identifying a sharply rising number of corpses from the South Korean ferry that sank nearly a week ago. AP Photo
Divers look for people believed to have been trapped in the sunken ferry Sewol near buoys which were installed to mark the vessel in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, south of Seoul, South Korea. One by one, coast guard officers carried the newly arrived bodies covered in white sheets from a boat to a tent on the dock of this island, the first step in identifying a sharply rising number of corpses from the South Korean ferry that sank nearly a week ago. AP Photo
Relatives of a passenger aboard the sunken ferry Sewol weep as they wait for their missing loved one at a port in Jindo, South Korea. The confirmed death toll from the April 16 disaster off South Korea's southern coast reached 130 Wednesday, officials said, and more than 170 people were still missing. AP Photo
Relatives of a passenger aboard the sunken ferry Sewol weep as they wait for their missing loved one at a port in Jindo, South Korea. The confirmed death toll from the April 16 disaster off South Korea's southern coast reached 130 Wednesday, officials said, and more than 170 people were still missing. AP Photo
A woman cries as she reads messages wishing for the safe return of missing passengers from capsized passenger ship Sewol at Danwon high school in Ansan. The confirmed death toll from a sunken South Korean ferry is rising faster as divers penetrate the dark, cold waters inside, feeling for children's bodies with their hands as they swim through a maze of cabins, corridors and upturned decks. The Sewol sank last Wednesday on a routine trip from the port of Incheon, near Seoul, to the southern island of Jeju. Reuters photo
A woman cries as she reads messages wishing for the safe return of missing passengers from capsized passenger ship Sewol at Danwon high school in Ansan. The confirmed death toll from a sunken South Korean ferry is rising faster as divers penetrate the dark, cold waters inside, feeling for children's bodies with their hands as they swim through a maze of cabins, corridors and upturned decks. The Sewol sank last Wednesday on a routine trip from the port of Incheon, near Seoul, to the southern island of Jeju. Reuters photo
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