1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Faulty prescription and paucity of drugs has often taken the lives of innocent patients. The problem is that most of the medicines prescribed by the doctors will be available only with chemists housed in the premises of the hospitals or clinics of the doctors issuing prescriptions.

Published: April 25, 2017 6:39 AM

A generic form of prescription

Faulty prescription and paucity of drugs has often taken the lives of innocent patients. The problem is that most of the medicines prescribed by the doctors will be available only with chemists housed in the premises of the hospitals or clinics of the doctors issuing prescriptions. Paucity of medicines is more due to the fact that medicine(s) prescribed by one doctor is not prescribed by the other. Therefore, the pharmacists whose shops are located in the premises of doctor prescribing that particular drug(s) only keep stock of them. Others do not bother to keep stock of the medicine generally not prescribed by the doctors having clinics or hospitals not situated in their vicinity. The Medical Council of India has made it mandatory for the doctors to issue prescriptions. This directive is observed by many doctors more in breach than in honour. The government must necessarily bestow its attention to ensure that the people get access to quality drugs at reasonable prices. MCI should keep a vigil over private hospitals and private doctors charging exorbitant fees from patients. The government hospitals should have dedicated doctors and nurses.

— KV Seetharamaiah, Hassan, Karnataka

Courting a time limit

As per reports, there are more than 3 crore cases pending in courts. In the lower courts of Delhi, some of these cases date back to 1960. A deadline needs to be set to settle the cases as in the case of Babri Masjid. If the parties do not appear on three specified dates, the cases should be decided ex-parte; not more than three adjournments should be allowed for any case. This procedure can definitely be applied, at least for civil cases. In criminal cases too, a time-frame for all procedures must be laid down under the appropriate Act. Alternatively, many litigants prefer out-of-court settlement when they feel frustrated over the delay. for facts

— Mahesh Kumar, New Delhi

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