1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

That the peaceful protests over the repeal of ban on jallikattu turned violent is unfortunate.

Updated: January 25, 2017 5:23 AM

Jallikattu violence
That the peaceful protests over the repeal of ban on jallikattu turned violent is unfortunate. While it is a matter of time before the ordinance ratified by the Tamil Nadu State Assembly gets the president’s assent for its enactment and paves the way for conducting bull-taming sport, the chief minister’s hasty move to inaugurate the bull-taming event in Madurai that eventually failed to materialise was avoidable. The promise of O Panneerselvam not satisfying the agitators makes one wonder whether the efforts channelised are worthy of the cause. When an unruly mob indulging in arson destroys public property, the police is duty-bound to maintain law and order, even if it means cracking down with the methods available to them. Police retaliate either in self-defence or when things go out of hand. Instead of calming the protesters, the DMK and Congress criticising police action clearly justifies the vandalism.

R Prabhu Raj, Bengaluru

RBI must break note-ban silence
The silence of RBI, two months after demonetisation, is troubling. The outbreak of WW-I in August 1914 touched off a financial crisis. The stock market crashed and banks runs happened. The US Fed, along with other central banks, was just getting organised. In the aftermath, a young Fed was powerless to offset the gold inflow or inflation. But it dedicated itself to supporting the war effort and, as the war matured, the Fed became a true central bank, increasing its financial resources and making the dollar a major world currency. Nearly a century later, we find RBI trying to take on a similar role, but in a well-heeled economy during peacetime. Was the war on black money as desperate and had dropped in unannounced as had WW- I? Though announcements post November 8 came from ministry spokesman, the 60-odd directives were of RBI. In its total abstention from both communication and transparency, it has adopted unwise traits. In one swoop, RBI has receded ages in history of monetary authorities’ progress. It must make amends, but that would take much effort and time.

R Narayanan, Ghaziabad

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