1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Apropos of the report ‘China’s Communist Party refers to Xi Jinping as party’s “core”’ (FE, October 26), the Chinese Communist Party’s elevation of its president Xi Jinping as the “core leader” and bringing him on a par with its founder, Mao Zedong, has not attracted the deserved global attention.

Published: November 8, 2016 6:28 AM

Uneasy lies the head…

Apropos of the report ‘China’s Communist Party refers to Xi Jinping as party’s “core”’ (FE, October 26), the Chinese Communist Party’s elevation of its president Xi Jinping as the “core leader” and bringing him on a par with its founder, Mao Zedong, has not attracted the deserved global attention. This is either due to major nations being too busy with problems of their own or being at a loss to react to a powerful totalitarian state set to be led by a plenipotentiary. We, as China’s neighbour, ought to have the largest concern. Xi is already party leader, head of state, commander-in-chief and the head of at least eight policy-making committees including economics, a portfolio traditionally under the premier. This would make the US president, ever at the mercy of the House and Senate, look very limp indeed! It must be Mao’ s little Red book that has kept both the party and ideology sticking together in China’s good and bad times. After 10% growth of over a decade, the sticky 6.7% for three consecutive quarters now, underscores major difficulties—China faces a shrinking workforce, a graying population, slowing private investment and a defiant smog, not only over its cities, but also one of corruption beneath them. Even Xi fears for the health of his party. The one redeeming factor would be China’s current external environs that could not have suited it better—the US is still a struggling economy at the moment, and so no immediate threat. But a Trump presidency could still be a worry for China. The euro zone is still contending with the huge fiscal anomalies of its members, the UK is tied up in knots over Brexit and Japan is chasing an elusive growth for close to two decades now. Thus, China has all the time to repair its internals—the reason why CPC made Xi its most powerful leader. But very likely, it would also expect proportionate results from Xi. Unlike a democracy where the ascent and downfall of top leadership is time consuming,the pace of change is swift in totalitarian environs and Xi must be well aware of the proposition.

R Narayanan, Ghaziabad

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