1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Apropos of the news report “Another set back for Modi govt: SC restores Congress rule in Arunachal” (FE, July 13), the decision of the Supreme Court to restore the Nabam Tuki-led Congress government in the Arunachal Pradesh by quashing all orders given by the Governor speaks volumes about Centre’s inability to handle such delicate situations in proper manner.

By: | Updated: July 14, 2016 6:56 AM

Act in federal interest
Apropos of the news report “Another set back for Modi govt: SC restores Congress rule in Arunachal” (FE, July 13), the decision of the Supreme Court to restore the Nabam Tuki-led Congress government in the Arunachal Pradesh by quashing all orders given by the Governor speaks volumes about Centre’s inability to handle such delicate situations in proper manner. It is quite interesting to learn that all the five judges were ‘unanimous’ in setting aside the orders of Governor Jyoti Prasad Rajkhowa while directing status quo ante in Arunachal as it prevailed on December 15, 2015—this is a rare phenomenon. But it may be pertinent to recall that earlier also the apex court had quashed President’s rule in Uttarakhand, much to the discomfiture of the Centre. This clearly indicates its failure to effectively deal with a situation in accordance with Constitutional provisions. In any case, Delhi CM Arvind Kejriwal must be the happiest man on the earth as the Supreme Court’s latest verdict has obviously provided him with fresh ammunition to fire more salvos at PM Narendra Modi as he (Kejriwal) has openly been alleging that the Delhi government is not been allowed to work at Modi’s instance. As is well known, Kejriwal, the bete-noire of PM Modi, never misses any opportunity to target him. The apex court decisions have badly tarnished the image of the Modi government. But it is also a godsent for the Congress Party. In all fairness, the BJP-led NDA government must take a serious note of these warning signals. It should also desist from its tendency to interfere in the working of the non-BJP state governments by toeing the line of Indira Gandhi, the former Prime Minister of the country.
Kumar Gupt, Panchkula (Haryana)
Develop healthcare, edu first
Former finance minister P Chidambaram has very rightly pointed out in his latest ‘Across the aisle’ column (FE, July10) that a crumbling healthcare and an education system in shambles have to be taken to the new frontiers of economic reforms if India aspires for sustained development. Despite quantitative expansion, these sectors show no traces of qualitative improvement. Still many people are pushed to poverty every year due to expensive, irregular and overburdened healthcare facilities. The status of the education system, especially public schools, is hardly different. A random visit to public schools in rural India will reflect sheer wastage of public money. It is true India has the potential to grow at an 8%-rate, or even faster, but without overhauling the healthcare and the education systems, the country will not develop in the right spirit.
Bhupendra, IIT Ropar
Pick humanity
Picking a side and backing it in a conflict involving precious human lives helps nobody. Taking sides only aggravates the conflict even further. All those who value human lives and share John Donne’s sentiment, “Any man’s death diminishes me because I am involved in mankind” must eschew taking sides and exert pressure on all parties to the conflict to make fresh attempts to bring to an end the bloodshed and human suffering the protracted conflict occasions. The latest eruption of unrest in the Kashmir Valley has a hard political and geo-political edge to it and it cannot be reduced to a mere ‘law and order problem’ and left to the security forces to tackle. Zapping the troublespot does not win the ‘hearts and minds’ of the people. As the situation is getting progressively worse, New Delhi can no longer take refuge in the polls with high voter turn-out to legitimise its control of the disputed territory, maintained at great cost and loss of life for three score years and ten. It must face facts and acknowledge the growing disaffection among the Kashmiris who have legitimate grievances against the central government and demands—long unfulfilled—for more autonomy and less presence of the army and agree to work out a road map to satisfy their legitimate political aspirations. Some compromise solution has to be found for the status of Kashmir in a spirit of insaniyat (common humanity) propounded by AB Vajpayee for lasting peace in the sub-continent.
G David Milton, Maruthancode (TN)

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