1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Train them early Apropos of the column “Why skills education has to be part of school curriculum” (FE, November 2), it is true that, like learning music, introducing skills training in schools can help students learn about a trade progressively, over a few years of study. In fact, with the rising demand of skills across […]

By: | Updated: November 14, 2015 1:35 AM

Train them early

Apropos of the column “Why skills education has to be part of school curriculum” (FE, November 2), it is true that, like learning music, introducing skills training in schools can help students learn about a trade progressively, over a few years of study. In fact, with the rising demand of skills across many professions, it is probably the time to review the need for introducing skills education at the school level itself, maybe towards the end of primary education. The advantages can be numerous. For example, young students can try learning multiple trades, visit industry workplaces, meet up with other students who are doing more or less the same thing, etc, and build interest before deciding to build a career in a particular trade. And learning progressively will allow them to understand the art of trade in a much better way and over a period of time, thereby increasing the probability of higher retention when they get employed. Further, introducing skills education at the school level will allow students who are not academically bright to build confidence about the skills and will also encourage them to learn skills early for building a more secure future for themselves. And as the author, Mr Ambarish Datta, rightly pointed out, schools, on their part, can perhaps offer a credit-based system for students learning various skills and this system, over a period of time, can supplement (even replace) academic scores. For example, students can attend skills courses at the school level during different years of study and collect credit points. In case they drop out, they can monetise the credits to enrol for a full-time or a part-time course to acquire a particular certificate. Such initiatives can go a long way towards meeting the goals of the Skill India mission.

Bhopal Singh Verma

Gurgaon

The rise of the BJP, again?

Apropos of the column “How can the BJP recover now?” (FE, November 10), it is clear that while Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s current record does not seemingly suggest that he has any novel ideas to change India, things might change very soon for the better for the BJP. No one understands it better than the PM himself. As a first, he might soon try and rein-in motor-mouths within the party. Secondly, he may try and get reforms through. In fact, after the Bihar elections defeat, the first news that came out from the party offices was that the government has announced FDI reforms in 15 major sectors. If Modi is able to get things right, and immediately, the BJP can transform India in a way that no future government can reverse.

Prashant Kumar

Noida

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